Amyris
AMYRIS, INC. (Form: 10-Q, Received: 05/09/2012 16:37:39)


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-Q
 
(Mark One)
x
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended  March 31, 2012
OR
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the Transition Period from              to             
Commission File Number: 001-34885
 
AMYRIS, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)  
Delaware
 
55-0856151
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
Amyris, Inc.
5885 Hollis Street, Suite 100
Emeryville, CA 94608
(510) 450-0761
(Address and telephone number of principal executive offices)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes   x     No   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuance to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes   x     No   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer.
Large accelerated filer
x
Accelerated filer
¨
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated filer
¨
Smaller reporting company
¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes   ¨     No   x

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.
Class
Outstanding at April 27, 2012
Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share
56,318,669 shares





AMYRIS, INC.
QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q
For the Quarterly Period Ended March 31, 2012
INDEX
 
 
 
Page
 
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
Item 1.
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
 
 
 
 
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
Item 1A.
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
Item 5.
Item 6.
 
 
Exhibit Index
 

 

 






PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Amyris, Inc.
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(In Thousands, Except Share and Per Share Amounts)
(Unaudited)

 
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Assets
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
103,417

 
$
95,703

Short-term investments
60

 
7,889

Accounts receivable, net of allowance of $245 and $245, respectively
4,707

 
6,936

Inventories
8,921

 
9,070

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
9,059

 
19,873

Total current assets
126,164

 
139,471

Property and equipment, net
150,702

 
128,101

Other assets
35,801

 
43,001

Goodwill and intangible assets
9,441

 
9,538

Total assets
$
322,108

 
$
320,111

Liabilities and Equity
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
Accounts payable
$
26,010

 
$
26,379

Deferred revenue
3,411

 
3,139

Accrued and other current liabilities
30,860

 
30,982

Capital lease obligation, current portion
3,260

 
3,717

Debt, current portion
29,015

 
28,049

Total current liabilities
92,556

 
92,266

Capital lease obligation, net of current portion
1,986

 
2,619

Long-term debt, net of current portion
37,485

 
13,275

Deferred rent, net of current portion
9,619

 
9,957

Deferred revenue, net of current portion
4,087

 
4,097

Other liabilities
43,980

 
37,085

Total liabilities
189,713

 
159,299

Commitments and contingencies (Note 5)

 

Stockholders’ equity:
 
 
 
Preferred stock - $0.0001 par value, 5,000,000 shares authorized, none issued and outstanding

 

Common stock - $0.0001 par value, 100,000,000 shares authorized as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011; 56,307,834 and 45,933,138 shares issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively
6

 
5

Additional paid-in capital
613,166

 
548,159

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(4,540
)
 
(5,924
)
Accumulated deficit
(475,736
)
 
(381,188
)
Total Amyris, Inc. stockholders’ equity
132,896

 
161,052

Noncontrolling interest
(501
)
 
(240
)
Total stockholders' equity
132,395

 
160,812

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity
$
322,108

 
$
320,111

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

1



Amyris, Inc.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations
(In Thousands, Except Share and Per Share Amounts)
(Unaudited)
 
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2012
 
2011
Revenues
 
 
 
Product sales
$
26,307

 
$
34,020

Grants and collaborations revenue
3,162

 
3,154

Total revenues
29,469

 
37,174

Cost and operating expenses
 
 
 
Cost of product sales
43,811

 
34,382

Loss on purchase commitments and write off of production assets
36,652

 

Research and development
21,344

 
19,736

Sales, general and administrative
21,715

 
15,978

Total cost and operating expenses
123,522

 
70,096

Loss from operations
(94,053
)
 
(32,922
)
Other income (expense):
 
 
 
Interest income
606

 
301

Interest expense
(1,054
)
 
(577
)
Other income (expense), net
(151
)
 
51

Total other income (expense)
(599
)
 
(225
)
Loss before income taxes
(94,652
)
 
(33,147
)
Provision for income taxes
(244
)
 

Net loss
$
(94,896
)
 
$
(33,147
)
Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest
348

 
10

Net loss attributable to Amyris, Inc. common stockholders
$
(94,548
)

$
(33,137
)
Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted
$
(1.88
)
 
$
(0.76
)
Weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding used in computing net loss per share of common stock, basic and diluted
50,214,192

 
43,851,142


See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.


2



Amyris, Inc.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss
(In Thousands)
(Unaudited)


 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2012
 
2011
Comprehensive loss:
 
 
 
Net loss
$
(94,896
)
 
$
(33,147
)
Change in unrealized loss on investments

 
5

Foreign currency translation adjustment, net of tax
1,471

 
540

Total comprehensive loss
(93,425
)
 
(32,602
)
Loss attributable to noncontrolling interest
348

 
10

Foreign currency translation adjustment attributable to noncontrolling interest
(87
)
 

Comprehensive loss attributable to Amyris, Inc.
$
(93,164
)
 
$
(32,592
)

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.


3



Amyris, Inc.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity
(Unaudited)


 
 
Common Stock
 
Additional
Paid-in
Capital
 
Accumulated
Deficit
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
 
Noncontrolling
Interest
 
Total
Equity
(In Thousands, Except Share and Per Share Amounts)
Shares
 
Amount
 
December 31, 2011
 
45,933,138

 
$
5

 
$
548,159

 
$
(381,188
)
 
$
(5,924
)
 
$
(240
)
 
$
160,812

Issuance of common stock upon exercise of stock options, net of restricted stock
 
107,236

 

 
383

 

 

 

 
383

Issuance of common stock in a private placement, net of issuance cost of $340
 
10,160,325

 
1

 
58,386

 

 

 

 
58,387

Restricted stock units settlement, net of tax withholdings
 
107,188

 

 
(283
)
 

 

 

 
(283
)
Repurchase of common stock
 
(53
)
 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock-based compensation
 

 

 
6,521

 

 

 

 
6,521

Foreign currency translation adjustment, net of tax
 

 

 

 

 
1,384

 
87

 
1,471

Net loss
 

 

 

 
(94,548
)
 

 
(348
)
 
(94,896
)
March 31, 2012
 
56,307,834

 
$
6

 
$
613,166

 
$
(475,736
)
 
$
(4,540
)
 
$
(501
)
 
$
132,395

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

4



Amyris, Inc.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(In Thousands)
(Unaudited)

 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2012
 
2011
Operating activities
 
 
 
Net loss
$
(94,896
)
 
$
(33,147
)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
3,687

 
2,105

Inventory write-down to net realizable value
8,127

 
357

Loss on disposal of property and equipment
2

 

Stock-based compensation
6,521

 
4,007

Amortization of premium on investments

 
457

Loss on purchase commitments and write off of production assets
36,652

 

Other noncash expenses
113

 
26

Changes in assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
Accounts receivable
2,227

 
305

Inventories
(8,192
)
 
(5,072
)
Prepaid expenses and other assets
(691
)
 
(719
)
Accounts payable
(2,417
)
 
6,188

Accrued and other liabilities
(12,957
)
 
6,261

Deferred revenue
262

 
(141
)
Deferred rent
(294
)
 
(198
)
Net cash used in operating activities
(61,856
)
 
(19,571
)
Investing activities
 
 
 
Purchase of short-term investments
(8,238
)
 
(1,767
)
Maturities of short-term investments

 
55,000

Sales of short-term investments
16,449

 

Acquisition of cash in noncontrolling interest

 
344

Purchase of property and equipment, net of disposals
(20,928
)
 
(13,917
)
Deposits on property and equipment
(849
)
 
(496
)
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
(13,566
)
 
39,164

Financing activities
 
 
 
Proceeds from issuance of common stock, net of repurchases
93

 
122

Proceeds from issuance of common stock in private placement, net of issuance cost
58,606

 

Principal payments on capital leases
(1,091
)
 
(683
)
Proceeds from debt
25,004

 
7,577

Principal payments on debt
(705
)
 
(3,485
)
Initial public offering costs

 
(494
)
Net cash provided by financing activities
81,907

 
3,037

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
1,229

 
86

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
7,714

 
22,716

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
95,703

 
143,060

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
$
103,417

 
$
165,776


5



Amyris, Inc.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows—(Continued)
(In Thousands)
(Unaudited)

 
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2012
 
2011
Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:
 
 
 
Cash paid for interest
$
755

 
$
539

Supplemental disclosures of noncash investing and financing activities:
 
 
 
Acquisitions of assets under accounts payable and accrued liabilities
$
(321
)
 
$
2,906

Change in unrealized gain (loss) on investments
$

 
$
5

Change in unrealized gain (loss) on foreign currency
$
1,457

 
$
(517
)
Accrued offering cost of common stock in private placement
$
220

 
$

Accrued issuance cost of convertible notes
$
99

 
$

Accrued deferred offering costs
$

 
$
2

Receivable from stock option exercises
$

 
$
1,373

Issuance of common stock upon exercise of warrants
$

 
$
3,554

Long term deposits used for fixed assets
$
11,723

 
$


See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

6



Amyris, Inc.
Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
 
1. The Company

Amyris, Inc. (the “Company”) was incorporated in California on July 17, 2003 and reincorporated in Delaware on June 10, 2010 for the purpose of leveraging breakthroughs in synthetic biology to develop and provide renewable compounds for a variety of markets. The Company is currently building and applying its industrial synthetic biology platform to provide alternatives to select petroleum-sourced products used in specialty chemical and transportation fuel markets worldwide. The Company’s first commercialization efforts have been focused on a molecule called farnesene, which forms the basis for a wide range of products varying from specialty chemical applications to transportation fuels, such as diesel. While the Company’s platform is able to use a wide variety of feedstocks, the Company has focused initially on Brazilian sugarcane. The Company intends to secure access to this feedstock and to expand its production capacity by working with existing sugar and ethanol mill owners to build new, adjacent bolt-on facilities at their existing mills in return for a share of the higher gross margin the Company believes it will realize from the sale of farnesene-derived products. In addition, the Company has entered into various contract manufacturing agreements to support commercial production. The Company has established two principal operating subsidiaries, Amyris Brasil Ltda. (formerly Amyris Brasil S.A., “Amyris Brasil”) for production in Brazil, and Amyris Fuels, LLC ("Amyris Fuels") for fuel distribution capabilities in the U.S.

On September 30, 2010, the Company closed its initial public offering (“IPO”) of 5,300,000 shares of common stock. Upon the closing of the IPO, the Company’s outstanding shares of convertible preferred stock were automatically converted into 31,550,277 shares of common stock and the outstanding convertible preferred stock warrants were automatically converted into common stock warrants to purchase a total of 195,604 shares of common stock and shares of Amyris Brasil held by third party investors were automatically converted into 861,155 shares of the Company’s common stock.

The Company has incurred significant losses since its inception. As of March 31, 2012 , the Company had an accumulated deficit of $475.7 million and management believes that it will continue to incur losses and cash outflows for the foreseeable future. The Company's plans for reducing cash outflows from operations in 2012 include reducing its cost structure by improving efficiency in its operations and reducing non-critical expenditures. The Company expects these efforts to include reductions in workforce and adjustments to the timing and scope of planned capital expenditures.
The Company's strategy is to focus on direct commercialization of higher-value, lower-volume markets while moving lower-margin, higher-volume commodity products into joint venture arrangements with established industry partners. To commercialize its products, the Company must be successful in using its technology to manufacture its products at commercial scale and on an economically viable basis. The Company has limited experience producing its products at commercial scale and the Company has encountered significant operational challenges that decreased production efficiency, created delays and increased production costs. As a result, the Company's prospects are subject to risks, expenses and uncertainties frequently encountered by companies in this stage of development. These risks include, but are not limited to, the Company's ability to finance its operations, its ability to achieve substantially higher production efficiencies than it has to date, timely completion of the construction and the commencement of operations at its production facilities, and its ability to secure additional collaborations and establish joint ventures on acceptable terms.

The Company expects to fund its operations for the foreseeable future with cash and investments currently on hand, with cash inflows from collaboration and grant funding, potential cash contributions from product sales, and with new debt and equity financing to provide additional working capital and to cover portions of its capital expenditures. In February 2012, the Company completed a private placement of 10.2 million shares of common stock for total proceeds of $58.7 million and raised $25.0 million through convertible promissory notes. The Company believes that, in order to fund our operations and other capital expenditures for the next twelve months, in addition to our existing cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments at March 31, 2012 , cash inflows from collaboration, grants and product sales, and reductions in cash outflows as a result of planned actions, it will be required to raise additional funds.

The Company's anticipated working capital needs and its planned operating and capital expenditures for 2012 and 2013 will require significant inflows of cash from credit facilities and similar sources of indebtedness, as well as funding from collaboration partners, some of which are not yet subject to definitive agreements or have not committed to funding arrangements. To the extent that additional capital is raised through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, the issuance of such securities could result in ownership dilution to existing stockholders and the Company may be subject to restrictive covenants that limit the Company's ability to conduct its business.

Beginning in March 2012, the Company initiated a plan to shift production capacity from the contract manufacturing

7



facilities to a Company-owned plant that is currently under construction. As a result, the Company evaluated its contract manufacturing agreements and recorded a loss of $31.2 million related to $10.0 million in facility modification costs and $21.2 million of fixed purchase commitments. The Company computed the loss on facility modification costs and fixed purchase commitments using the same lower of cost or market approach that is used to value inventory. The computation of the loss on firm purchase commitments is subject to several estimates, including the cost to complete and the ultimate selling price of any Company products manufactured at the relevant production facilities, and is therefore inherently uncertain. The Company also recorded losses on write off of production assets of $5.5 million related to Amyris-owned equipment at contract manufacturing facilities.

Failure to significantly reduce losses and cash outflows from operations, raise additional capital or to remain in compliance with restrictive covenants, could have a material adverse effect on the Company's ability to achieve its intended business objectives. If this happens, the Company may be forced to curtail or cease operations and delay or terminate research and development programs or the commercialization of products resulting from its technologies. The Company may be unable to proceed with construction of certain planned production facilities, enter into definitive agreements for supply of feedstock and associated production arrangements that are currently subject to letters of intent, commercialize its products within the timeline it expects, or otherwise continue its business as currently contemplated.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying interim condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and with the instructions for Form 10-Q and Regulations S-X statements. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and notes required for complete financial statements. These interim condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto contained in the Company’s Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on February 28, 2012. The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Principles of Consolidations

The Company has interests in joint venture entities that are variable interest entities (“VIEs”). Determining whether to consolidate a variable interest entity may require judgment in assessing (i) whether an entity is a VIE and (ii) if the Company is the entity’s primary beneficiary and thus required to consolidate the entity. To determine if the Company is the primary beneficiary of a VIE, the Company evaluates whether it has (i) the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact the VIE’s economic performance and (ii) the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits of the VIE that could potentially be significant to the VIE. The Company’s evaluation includes identification of significant activities and an assessment of its ability to direct those activities based on governance provisions and arrangements to provide or receive product and process technology, product supply, operations services, equity funding and financing and other applicable agreements and circumstances. The Company’s assessment of whether it is the primary beneficiary of its VIEs requires significant assumptions and judgment.

The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements of the Company include the accounts of Amyris, Inc., its subsidiaries and two consolidated VIEs with respect to which the Company is considered the primary beneficiary, after elimination of intercompany accounts and transactions. Disclosure regarding the Company’s participation in the VIEs is included in Note 8.

Use of Estimates

In preparing the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements, management must make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities as of the date of the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Unaudited Interim Financial Information

The accompanying interim condensed consolidated financial statements and related disclosures are unaudited, have been prepared on the same basis as the annual consolidated financial statements and, in the opinion of management, reflect all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair statement of the results of operations for the periods presented. The condensed consolidated results of operations for any interim period are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year or for any other future year or interim period.

8




Concentration of Credit Risk

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to a concentration of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments, accounts receivable and derivative commodity financial instruments. The Company places its cash equivalents and investments with high credit quality financial institutions and, by policy, limits the amount of credit exposure with any one financial institution. Deposits held with banks may exceed the amount of insurance provided on such deposits. The Company has not experienced any losses on its deposits of cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments.

The Company’s accounts receivable are primarily derived from customers located in the United States. The Company performs ongoing credit evaluation of its customers, does not require collateral, and maintains allowances for potential credit losses on customer accounts when deemed necessary.

Customers representing 10% or greater of accounts receivable were as follows:
 
Customers
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Customer A
15
%
 
20
%
Customer B
13
%
 
**

Customer C
11
%
 
**

Customer D
10
%
 
**

Customer E
14
%
 
10
%
Customer F
10
%
 
**

 
** Less than 10%

Customers representing 10% or greater of revenues were as follows:
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
Customers
2012
 
2011
Customer A
23
%
 
**

Customer B
**

 
**

Customer C
**

 
**

Customer D
**

 
*

Customer E
**

 
*

Customer F
**

 
 *

Customer G
**

 
32
%
Customer H
**

 
14
%
Customer J
12
%
 
**


 * Not a customer
** Less than 10%

The Company is exposed to counterparty credit risk on all of its derivative commodity instruments. The Company has established and maintains strict counterparty credit guidelines and enters into agreements only with counterparties that are investment grade or better. The Company does not require collateral under these agreements.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The Company measures certain financial assets and liabilities at fair value based on the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants. Where available, fair value is based on or derived from observable market prices or other observable inputs. Where observable prices or inputs are not available, valuation models are applied. These valuation techniques involve some level of management estimation and judgment, the degree of which is dependent on the price transparency for the instruments or market and the instruments’ complexity.


9



The carrying amounts of certain financial instruments, such as cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, approximate fair value due to their relatively short maturities, and low market interest rates if applicable. The fair values of the notes payable, loan payable, convertible notes and credit facility are based on the present value of expected future cash flows and assumptions about current interest rates and the creditworthiness of the Company.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

All highly liquid investments purchased with an original maturity date of 90 days or less at the date of purchase are considered to be cash equivalents. Cash and cash equivalents consist of money market funds, certificates of deposit, commercial paper, U.S. Government agency securities and various deposit accounts. Certificates of deposit that have maturities less than 90 days from the consolidated balance sheet date are classified as cash and cash equivalents.

Accounts Receivable

The Company maintains an allowance for doubtful accounts receivable for estimated losses resulting from the inability of its customers to make required payments. The Company determines this allowance based on specific doubtful account identification and management judgment on estimated exposure. The Company writes off accounts receivable against the allowance when it determines a balance is uncollectible and no longer actively pursues collection of the receivable. 

Investments

Investments with original maturities greater than 90 days that mature less than one year from the consolidated balance sheet date are classified as short-term investments. The Company classifies investments as short-term or long-term based upon whether such assets are reasonably expected to be realized in cash or sold or consumed during the normal cycle of business. The Company invests its excess cash balances primarily in certificates of deposit, short-term investment grade commercial paper and corporate bonds, and U.S. Government agency securities and notes. Certificates of deposits that have maturities greater than 90 days that mature less than one year from the consolidated balance sheet date are classified as short term investments. The Company classifies all of its investments as available-for-sale and records such assets at estimated fair value in the consolidated balance sheets, with unrealized gains and losses, if any, reported as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in stockholders’ equity. Debt securities are adjusted for amortization of premiums and accretion of discounts and such amortization and accretion are reported as a component of interest income. Realized gains and losses and declines in value that are considered to be other than temporary are recognized in the statements of operations. The cost of securities sold is determined on the specific identification method. There were no significant realized gains or losses from sales of debt securities during the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 . As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , the Company did not have any other-than-temporary declines in the fair value of its debt securities.

Inventories

Inventories, which consist of ethanol, reformulated ethanol-blended gasoline and farnesene-derived products, are stated at the lower of cost or market and categorized as finished goods, work-in-process or raw material inventories. The Company evaluates the recoverability of its inventories based on assumptions about expected demand and net realizable value. If the Company determines that the cost of inventories exceeds its estimated net realizable value, the Company records a write-down equal to the difference between the cost of inventories and the estimated net realizable value. If actual net realizable values are less favorable than those projected by management, additional inventory write-downs may be required that could negatively impact the Company's operating results. If actual net realizable values are more favorable, the Company may have favorable operating results when products that have been previously written down are sold in the normal course of business. The Company also evaluates the terms of our agreements with its suppliers and establish accruals for estimated losses on adverse purchase commitments as necessary, applying the same lower of cost or market approach that is used to value inventory. Cost is computed on a first-in, first-out basis. Inventory costs include transportation costs incurred in bringing the inventory to its existing location.

For the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , the Company incurred losses totaling $8.1 million and $357,000 , respectively, as a result of applying the lower-of-cost-or-market inventory rules.

Derivative Instruments

The Company is exposed to market risks related to price volatility of ethanol and reformulated ethanol-blended gasoline. The Company makes limited use of derivative instruments, which include futures positions on the New York Mercantile Exchange and the CME/Chicago Board of Trade to mitigate such risks. The Company does not engage in speculative derivative activities, and the purpose of its activity in derivative commodity instruments is to manage the financial risk posed by physical transactions

10



and inventory. Changes in the fair value of the derivative contracts are recognized currently in the consolidated statements of operations as specific hedge accounting criteria are not met.

Asset Retirement Obligations

The fair value of an asset retirement obligation is recognized in the period in which it is incurred if a reasonable estimate of fair value can be made. In addition, asset retirement cost is added to the carrying amount of the associated asset and this additional carrying amount is amortized over the life of the asset. The Company’s asset retirement obligations are associated with its commitment to return property subject to an operating lease in Brazil to its original condition upon lease termination.
 
As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , the Company recorded asset retirement obligations of $1.2 million and $1.1 million , respectively. The related leasehold improvements are being amortized to depreciation expense over the term of the lease or the useful life of the assets, whichever is shorter. Related amortization expense was $68,000 and $44,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , respectively.

The change in the asset retirement obligation is summarized below (in thousands):
 
Balance at December 31, 2011
$
1,129

Additions

Foreign currency impacts and other adjustments
32

Accretion expenses recorded during the period
32

Balance at March 31, 2012
$
1,193


Property and Equipment, net

Property and equipment, net are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Depreciation and amortization is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the related assets. Maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred, and improvements and betterments are capitalized. When assets are retired or otherwise disposed of, the cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the balance sheet and any resulting gain or loss is reflected in operations in the period realized.

Depreciation and amortization periods for the Company’s property and equipment are as follows:
 
Machinery and equipment
7-15 years
Computers and software
3-5 years
Furniture and office equipment
5 years
Vehicles
5 years

Leasehold improvements are amortized on a straight-line basis over the terms of the lease, or the useful life of the assets, whichever is shorter.

Computers and software includes internal-use software that is acquired, internally developed or modified to meet the Company’s internal needs. Amortization commences when the software is ready for its intended use and the amortization period is the estimated useful life of the software, generally three to five years. Capitalized costs primarily include contract labor and payroll costs of the individuals dedicated to the development of internal-use software. Capitalized software additions totaled approximately $263,000 and $408,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , respectively, related to software development costs pertaining to the installation of a new financial reporting system. For the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , $147,000 and $114,000 , respectively, of amortization expense was recorded and as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , the total unamortized cost of capitalized software was $2.9 million and $2.8 million , respectively.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

Long-lived assets to be held and used are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable or the estimated useful life is no longer appropriate. If indicators of impairment exist and the undiscounted projected cash flows associated with such assets are less than the carrying amount of the asset, an impairment loss is recorded to write the asset down to their estimated fair values. Fair value is estimated based on

11



discounted future cash flows. The Company recorded losses on write off of production assets of $5.5 million and zero during the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , respectively.

Goodwill and Intangible Assets  

Goodwill represents the excess of the cost over the fair value of net assets acquired from our business combinations. Intangible assets are comprised primarily of in-process research and development ("IPR&D"). The Company makes significant judgments in relation to the valuation of goodwill and intangible assets resulting from business combinations.

 
There are several methods that can be used to determine the estimated fair value of the IPR&D acquired in a business combination. The Company utilized the "income method," which applies a probability weighting that considers the risk of development and commercialization, to the estimated future net cash flows that are derived from projected sales revenues and estimated costs. These projections are based on factors such as relevant market size, pricing of similar products, and expected industry trends. The estimated future net cash flows are then discounted to the present value using an appropriate discount rate. These assets are treated as indefinite-lived intangible assets until completion or abandonment of the projects, at which time the assets will be amortized over the remaining useful life or written off, as appropriate.

Goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite lives are assessed for impairment using fair value measurement techniques on an annual basis or more frequently if facts and circumstance warrant such a review. When required, a comparison of fair value to the carrying amount of assets is performed to determine the amount of any impairment.

 
The Company evaluates its intangible assets with finite lives for indications of impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable. Intangible assets consist of purchased licenses and permits and are amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives. Factors that could trigger an impairment review include significant under-performance relative to expected historical or projected future operating results, significant changes in the manner of use of the acquired assets or the strategy for overall business or significant negative industry or economic trends. If this evaluation indicates that the value of the intangible asset may be impaired, the Company makes an assessment of the recoverability of the net carrying value of the asset over its remaining useful life. If this assessment indicates that the intangible asset is not recoverable, based on the estimated undiscounted future cash flows of the technology over the remaining amortization period, the Company reduce the net carrying value of the related intangible asset to fair value and may adjust the remaining amortization period. Any such impairment charge could be significant and could have a material adverse effect on the Company's reported financial results. The Company has not recognized any impairment charges on intangible assets through March 31, 2012 .

In-Process Research and Development

 
During 2011, the Company recorded IPR&D of $8.6 million related to the acquisition of Draths Corporation ("Draths"). Amounts recorded as IPR&D will begin being amortized upon first sales of the product over the estimated useful life of the technology. In accordance with authoritative accounting guidance, since the technology has not yet been proven, the amortization of the acquired IPR&D has not begun. The Company estimates that it could take up to three years before it will have viable products resulting from the acquired technology.

Noncontrolling Interest

Changes in noncontrolling interest ownership that do not result in a change of control and where there is a difference between fair value and carrying value are accounted for as equity transactions.

On April 14, 2010, the Company entered into a joint venture with Usina São Martinho. The carrying value of the noncontrolling interest from this joint venture is recorded in the equity section of the consolidated balance sheets (see Note 8).

On January 3, 2011, the Company entered into a production service agreement with Glycotech, Inc. ("Glycotech"). The Company has determined that the arrangement with Glycotech qualifies as a VIE. The Company determined that it is the primary beneficiary. The carrying value of the noncontrolling interest from this VIE is recorded in the equity section of the consolidated balance sheets (see Note 8).

Revenue Recognition

The Company recognizes revenue from the sale of ethanol, reformulated ethanol-blended gasoline and farnesene-derived products, delivery of research and development services, and governmental grants. Revenue is recognized when all of the following

12



criteria are met: persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, the fee is fixed or determinable, and collectability is reasonably assured.

If sales arrangements contain multiple elements, the Company evaluates whether the components of each arrangement represent separate units of accounting. To date the Company has determined that all revenue arrangements should be accounted for as a single unit of accounting.

Product Sales

The Company sells ethanol and reformulated ethanol-blended gasoline under short-term agreements at prevailing market prices. Ethanol and reformulated ethanol-blended gasoline sales consists of sales to customers through purchases from third-party suppliers in which the Company takes physical control of the ethanol and reformulated ethanol-blended gasoline and accepts risk of loss. Starting in the second quarter of 2011, the Company began to sell farnesene-derived products , which are procured from contracted third parties, but such revenues have not been significant to date. Our renewable product sales do not include rights of return. Returns are only accepted if the product does not meet product specifications and such non conformity is communicated to the Company within a set number of days of delivery. Revenues are recognized, net of discounts and allowances, once passage of title and risk of loss has occurred and contractually specified acceptance criteria have been met, provided all other revenue recognition criteria have also been met.

Grants and Collaborative Revenue

Revenue from collaborative research services is recognized as the services are performed consistent with the performance requirements of the contract. In cases where the planned levels of research services fluctuate over the research term, the Company recognizes revenue using the proportionate performance method based upon actual efforts to date relative to the amount of expected effort to be incurred by the Company. When up-front payments are received and the planned levels of research services do not fluctuate over the research term, revenue is recorded on a ratable basis over the arrangement term, up to the amount of cash received. When up-front payments are received and the planned levels of research services fluctuate over the research term, revenue is recorded using the proportionate performance method, up to the amount of cash received. Where arrangements include milestones that are determined to be substantive and at risk at the inception of the arrangement, revenue is recognized upon achievement of the milestone and is limited to those amounts whereby collectability is reasonably assured.

Government grants are agreements that generally provide cost reimbursement for certain types of expenditures in return for research and development activities over a contractually defined period. Revenues from government grants are recognized in the period during which the related costs are incurred, provided that the conditions under which the government grants were provided have been met and only perfunctory obligations are outstanding.

Cost of Product Sales

Cost of product sales consists primarily of cost of purchased ethanol and reformulated ethanol-blended gasoline, terminal fees paid for storage and handling, transportation costs between terminals and changes in the fair value of derivative commodity instruments. Starting in the second quarter of 2011, cost of product sales also includes production costs of farnesene-derived products, which include cost of raw materials, amounts paid to contract manufacturers and period costs including inventory write-downs resulting from applying lower-of-cost-or-market inventory rules. Cost of farnesene-derived products also include some costs related to the scale-up in production of such products.

Shipping and handling costs charged to customers are recorded as revenues. Shipping costs are included in cost of product revenues. Such charges were not significant in any of the periods presented.

Costs of Start-Up Activities

Start-up activities are defined as those one-time activities related to opening a new facility, introducing a new product or service, conducting business in a new territory, conducting business with a new class of customer or beneficiary, initiating a new process in an existing facility, commencing some new operation or activities related to organizing a new entity. All the costs associated with start-up activities related to a potential facility are expensed and recorded within selling, general and administrative expenses until the facility is considered viable by management, at which time costs would be considered for capitalization based on authoritative accounting literature.


13



Research and Development

Research and development costs are expensed as incurred and include costs associated with research performed pursuant to collaborative agreements and government grants. Research and development costs consist of direct and indirect internal costs related to specific projects as well as fees paid to others that conduct certain research activities on the Company’s behalf.
 
Income Taxes

The Company accounts for income taxes under the asset and liability method, which requires, among other things, that deferred income taxes be provided for temporary differences between the tax basis of the Company’s assets and liabilities and their financial statement reported amounts. In addition, deferred tax assets are recorded for the future benefit of utilizing net operating losses and research and development credit carryforwards. A valuation allowance is provided against deferred tax assets unless it is more likely than not that they will be realized.

The Company recognizes and measures uncertain tax positions in accordance with Income Taxes subtopic 05-6 of ASC 740, which prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement process for recording uncertain tax positions taken, or expected to be taken in a tax return, in the consolidated financial statements. Additionally, the guidance also prescribes treatment for the derecognition, classification, accounting in interim periods and disclosure requirements for uncertain tax positions. The Company accrues for the estimated amount of taxes for uncertain tax positions if it is more likely than not that the Company would be required to pay such additional taxes. An uncertain tax position will not be recognized if it has a less than 50% likelihood of being sustained.

Currency Translation

The Brazilian real is the functional currency of the Company’s wholly-owned subsidiary in Brazil and also of the Company’s joint venture with Usina São Martinho. Accordingly, asset and liability accounts of those operations are translated into United States dollars using the current exchange rate in effect at the balance sheet date and equity accounts are translated into United States dollars using historical rates. The revenues and expenses are translated using the exchange rates in effect when the transactions occur. Gains and losses from foreign currency translation adjustments are included as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in the consolidated balance sheets.

Stock-Based Compensation

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation arrangements with employees using a fair value method which requires the recognition of compensation expense for costs related to all stock-based payments including stock options. The fair value method requires the Company to estimate the fair value of stock-based payment awards on the date of grant using an option pricing model. The Company uses the Black-Scholes pricing model to estimate the fair value of options granted, which is expensed on a straight-line basis over the vesting period. The Company accounts for restricted stock unit awards issued to employees based on the fair market value of the Company’s common stock.

The Company accounts for stock options issued to nonemployees based on the estimated fair value of the awards using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The Company accounts for restricted stock units issued to nonemployees based on the fair market value of the Company’s common stock. The measurement of stock-based compensation is subject to periodic adjustments as the underlying equity instruments vest, and the resulting change in value, if any, is recognized in the Company’s consolidated statements of operations during the period the related services are rendered.

Comprehensive Income (Loss)

Comprehensive income (loss) represents all changes in stockholders’ equity (deficit) except those resulting from investments or contributions by stockholders. The Company’s unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale securities and foreign currency translation adjustments represent the components of comprehensive income (loss) excluded from the Company’s net loss and have been disclosed in the consolidated statements of comprehensive loss for all periods presented.

The components of accumulated other comprehensive loss are as follows (in thousands):
 
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Foreign currency translation adjustment, net of tax
$
(4,540
)
 
$
(5,924
)
Total accumulated other comprehensive loss
$
(4,540
)
 
$
(5,924
)

14




Net Loss Attributable to Common Stockholders and Net Loss per Share

The Company computes net loss per share in accordance with ASC 260, “Earnings per Share.” Basic net loss per share of common stock is computed by dividing the Company’s net loss attributable to Amyris, Inc. common stockholders by the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted net loss per share of common stock is computed by giving effect to all potentially dilutive securities, including stock options, restricted stock units, common stock warrants, using the treasury stock method or the as converted method, as applicable. For all periods presented, basic net loss per share was the same as diluted net loss per share because the inclusion of all potentially dilutive securities outstanding was anti-dilutive. As such, the numerator and the denominator used in computing both basic and diluted net loss are the same for each period presented.

The following table presents the calculation of basic and diluted net loss per share of common stock attributable to Amyris, Inc. common stockholders (in thousands, except share and per share amounts):
 
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2012
 
2011
Numerator:
 
 
 
Net loss attributable to Amyris, Inc. common stockholders
$
(94,548
)
 
$
(33,137
)
Denominator:
 
 
 
Weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding used in computing net loss per share of common stock, basic and diluted
50,214,192

 
43,851,142

Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted
$
(1.88
)
 
$
(0.76
)

The following outstanding shares of potentially dilutive securities were excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share of common stock for the periods presented because including them would have been antidilutive:
 
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2012
 
2011
Period-end stock options to purchase common stock
7,928,567

 
6,932,703

Convertible promissory notes
3,536,968

 

Period-end common stock subject to repurchase
5,564

 
25,446

Period-end common stock warrants
23,339

 
5,136

Period-end restricted stock units
219,183

 
341,333

Total
11,713,621

 
7,304,618


______________ 
The common stock warrants at March 31, 2012 includes 21,087 warrants issued in 2011 and 5,136 common stock warrants converted from preferred stock warrants computed on an as converted basis using the conversion ratios in effect as of September 30, 2010, the date of the IPO closing.
 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements


In May 2011, the FASB issued an amendment to an accounting standard related to fair value measurement. This amendment is intended to result in convergence between U.S. GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) requirements for measurement of and disclosures about fair value. This guidance clarifies the application of existing fair value measurements and disclosures, and changes certain principles or requirements for fair value measurements and disclosures. The amended guidance is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011. The adoption of this amended guidance required expanded disclosure in the Company's consolidated financial statements but did not impact financial results.

In June 2011, the FASB issued an amendment to an accounting standard related to the presentation of the Statement of Comprehensive Income. This amendment requires companies to present the components of net income and other comprehensive income either as one continuous statement or as two consecutive statements. It eliminates the option to present components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of changes in stockholders' equity. The amended guidance is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011 with full retrospective application required. Early adoption is

15



permitted. The Company chose early adoption of this guidance effective its year ended December 31, 2011 through a separate presentation of its Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009. The adoption of this amended guidance changed the financial statement presentation and required expanded disclosures in the Company's consolidated financial statements, but did not impact financial results.

In September 2011, the FASB approved a revised accounting standard update intended to simplify how an entity tests goodwill for impairment. The amendment will allow an entity to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is necessary to perform the two-step quantitative goodwill impairment test. An entity no longer will be required to calculate the fair value of a reporting unit unless the entity determines, based on a qualitative assessment, that it is more likely than not that its fair value is less than its carrying amount. This accounting standard update is effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011. The adoption of this amended guidance did not have any impact on the Company's financial results.

In December 2011, the International Accounting Standards Board ("IASB") and the FASB issued common disclosure requirements that are intended to enhance comparability between financial statements prepared on the basis of U.S. GAAP and those prepared in accordance with IFRS. This new guidance affects all entities with financial instruments or derivatives that are either presented on a net basis on the balance sheet or subject to an enforceable master netting arrangement or similar arrangement. While this guidance does not change existing offsetting criteria in U.S. GAAP or the permitted balance sheet presentation for items meeting the criteria, it requires an entity to disclose both net and gross information about assets and liabilities that have been offset and the related arrangements. Required disclosures under this new guidance should be provided retrospectively for all comparative periods presented. This new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning or or after January 1, 2013, and interim periods within those years, which would be the Company's first quarter of fiscal 2013. The Company does not expect that the adoption of this new guidance will have an impact on its financial position, results of operations or cash flows as it is disclosure only in nature.

3. Fair Value Measurements

The inputs to the valuation techniques used to measure fair value are classified into the following categories:

Level 1: Quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

Level 2: Observable market-based inputs or unobservable inputs that are corroborated by market data.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs that are not corroborated by market data.


As of March 31, 2012 , the Company’s financial assets and financial liabilities are presented below at fair value and classification within the fair value hierarchy as follows (in thousands):
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
 
Balance as of March 31, 2012
Financial Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Money market funds
$
66,600

 
$

 
$

 
$
66,600

Certificates of deposit
20,465

 

 

 
20,465

Derivative asset
57

 

 

 
57

Total financial assets
$
87,122

 
$

 
$

 
$
87,122

Financial Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Notes payable
$

 
$
2,859

 
$

 
$
2,859

Loan payable

 
19,513

 

 
19,513

Credit facility

 
18,950

 

 
18,950

Convertible notes

 

 
24,122

 
24,122

Derivative liabilities

 

 

 

Total financial liabilities
$

 
$
41,322

 
$
24,122

 
$
65,444



16



The Company’s assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value measurement in its entirety requires management to make judgments and consider factors specific to the asset or liability. The fair values of money market funds are based on fair values of identical assets. The fair values of the notes payable, loan payable, convertible notes and credit facility are based on the present value of expected future cash flows and assumptions about current interest rates and the creditworthiness of the Company. Market risk associated with our fixed and variable rate long-term debt relates to the potential reduction in fair value and negative impact to future earnings, respectively, from an increase in interest rates.

As of December 31, 2011 , the Company’s financial assets and financial liabilities are presented below at fair value and classification within the fair value hierarchy as follows (in thousands):
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
 
Balance as of December 31, 2011
Financial Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Money market funds
$
57,127

 
$

 
$

 
$
57,127

Certificates of Deposit
27,384

 

 

 
27,384

US Government agency securities

 

 

 

Total financial assets
$
84,511

 
$

 
$

 
$
84,511

Financial Liabilities

 

 

 

Derivative liabilities
$
18

 
$

 
$

 
$
18

Total financial liabilities
$
18

 
$

 
$

 
$
18



Derivative Instruments

The Company utilizes derivative financial instruments to mitigate its exposure to certain market risks associated with its ongoing operations. The primary objective for holding derivative financial instruments is to manage commodity price risk. The Company’s derivative instruments principally include Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) ethanol futures and Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (RBOB) gasoline futures. All derivative commodity instruments are recorded at fair value on the consolidated balance sheets. None of the Company’s derivative instruments are designated as a hedging instrument. Changes in the fair value of these non-designated hedging instruments are recognized in cost of product sales in the consolidated statements of operations.

Derivative instruments measured at fair value as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , and their classification on the consolidated balance sheets and consolidated statements of operations, are presented in the following tables (in thousands) except contract amounts:

 
Asset/Liability as of
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Type of Derivative Contract
Quantity of
Short
Contracts
 
Fair Value
 
Quantity of
Short
Contracts
 
Fair Value
Regulated fixed price futures contracts, included as asset in prepaid expenses and other current assets
15
 
$
57

 
 
$

Regulated fixed price futures contracts, included as liability in accounts payable
 
$

 
22
 
$
18

 
Type of Derivative Contract
 
Income
Statement Classification
Three Months Ended March 31,
2012
 
2011
 
 
 
Gain (Loss) Recognized
Regulated fixed price futures contracts
 
Cost of product sales
$
(720
)
 
$
(1,850
)


4. Balance Sheet Components

17




Investments

The following table summarizes the Company’s investments as of March 31, 2012 (in thousands):

 
March 31, 2012
 
Amortized
Cost
 
Unrealized Gain
(Loss)
 
Fair Value
Short-Term Investments
 
 
 
 
 
Certificates of Deposit
$
60

 
$

 
$
60

Total short-term investments
$
60

 
$

 
$
60


The following table summarizes the Company’s investments as of December 31, 2011 (in thousands):

 
December 31, 2011
 
Amortized
Cost
 
Unrealized Gain
(Loss)
 
Fair Value
Short-Term Investments
 
 
 
 
 
Certificates of Deposit
$
7,889

 
$

 
$
7,889

Total short-term investments
$
7,889

 
$

 
$
7,889


Inventories

Inventories, net is comprised of the following (in thousands):
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Raw materials
$
2,163

 
$
2,191

Work-in-process
936

 
1,237

Finished goods
5,822

 
5,642

Inventories, net
$
8,921

 
$
9,070


Prepaid and Other Current Assets

Prepaid and other current assets is comprised of the following (in thousands):
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Advances to contract manufacturers (1)
$
1,032

 
$
10,748

Manufacturing catalysts
2,378

 
3,929

Recoverable VAT and other taxes
2,787

 
2,193

Other
2,862

 
3,003

Prepaid and other current assets
$
9,059

 
$
19,873


(1)  
At March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , this amount includes $764,000 and $748,000 , respectively, of the current unamortized portion of equipment costs funded by the Company to a contract manufacturer. The related amortization is being offset against purchases of inventory.


Property and Equipment, net

Property and equipment, net is comprised of the following (in thousands):  

18



 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Leasehold improvements
$
39,704

 
$
40,011

Machinery and equipment
56,518

 
59,657

Computers and software
6,551

 
6,491

Furniture and office equipment
2,310

 
2,223

Vehicles
612

 
596

Construction in progress
74,796

 
45,318

 
$
180,491

 
154,296

Less: accumulated depreciation and amortization
(29,789
)
 
(26,195
)
Property and equipment, net
$
150,702

 
$
128,101


Property and equipment includes $12.8 million and $13.7 million of machinery and equipment and furniture and office equipment under capital leases as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , respectively. Accumulated amortization of assets under capital leases totaled $5.1 million and $4.7 million as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , respectively.

Depreciation and amortization expense, including amortization of assets under capital leases, was $3.6 million and $2.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , respectively.

Other Assets

Other assets are comprised of the following (in thousands):  
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Deferred charge asset (1)
$
16,106

 
$
18,792

Deposits on property and equipment, including taxes
5,009

 
17,455

Advances to contract manufacturers, net of current portion (2)
2,739

 
2,866

Recoverable taxes on purchased property and equipment and inventories
10,201

 
2,075

Other
1,746

 
1,813

Total other assets
$
35,801

 
$
43,001

______________ 
(1)  
The deferred charge asset relates to the collaboration agreement between the Company and Total (see Note 9).

(2)  
At March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , the amount of $2.7 million and $2.9 million , respectively, relates to the non-current unamortized portion of equipment costs funded by the Company to a contract manufacturer. The related amortization is being offset against purchases of inventory.

 
Accrued and Other Current Liabilities

Accrued and other current liabilities are comprised of the following (in thousands):
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Professional services
$
3,337

 
$
4,384

Accrued vacation
2,891

 
2,761

Payroll and related expenses
7,141

 
6,343

Construction in progress
1,324

 
4,992

Tax-related liabilities
1,151

 
2,180

Deferred rent, current portion
1,318

 
1,274

Contractual obligations to contract manufacturers
11,228

 

Customer advances
625

 
3,667

Refundable exercise price on early exercise of stock options
22

 
30

Other
1,823

 
5,351

Total accrued and other current liabilities
$
30,860

 
$
30,982



19



Other Liabilities

Other liabilities are comprised of the following (in thousands):
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Contingently repayable advance from related party collaborator (1)
$
31,922

 
$
31,922

Bonus payable to contract manufacturer, non-current
2,500

 
2,500

Contractual obligations to contract manufacturers, non-current
6,446

 

Asset retirement obligations
1,193

 
1,129

Other
1,919

 
1,534

Total other liabilities
$
43,980

 
$
37,085

______________ 
(1)  
The contingently repayable advance from related party collaborator relates to the collaboration agreement between the Company and Total.

In November 2011, the Company and Total Gas & Power USA SAS (“Total”) entered into an amendment of their Technology License, Development, Research and Collaboration Agreement (the "Amendment”). The Amendment provides for an exclusive strategic collaboration for the development of renewable diesel products and contemplates that the parties will establish a joint venture (the “JV”) for the production and commercialization of such renewable diesel products on an exclusive, worldwide basis. In addition, the Amendment provides the JV with the right to produce and commercialize certain other chemical products on a non-exclusive basis. The Amendment further provides that definitive agreements to form the JV must be in place by March 31, 2012 or other date as agreed to by the parties or the renewable diesel program, including any further collaboration payments by Total related to the renewable diesel program, will terminate. The parties are currently engaged in discussion regarding the potential terms and timing of an extension to such date. The continuation of the renewable diesel program and the formation of the JV are also subject to certain mutual intellectual property due diligence conditions. Under the Amendment, each party retains certain rights to independently produce and sell renewable diesel under specified circumstances subject to paying royalties to the other party.

Pursuant to the Amendment, Total has agreed to solely fund the following amounts: (i) the first $30.0 million in research and development costs related to the renewable diesel program which have been incurred since August 1, 2011, which amount shall be in addition to the $50.0 million in research and development funding contemplated by the Collaboration Agreement, and (ii) for any research and development costs incurred following the JV formation date that are not covered by the initial $30.0 million , an additional $10.0 million in 2012 and up to an additional $10.0 million in 2013, which amounts will be considered part of the $50.0 million contemplated by the Collaboration Agreement. In addition to these payments, Total has further agreed to fund 50%  of all remaining research and development costs for the renewable diesel program under the Amendment.

Total has an option for a period of 90 days, following the completion of the renewable diesel program on December 31, 2013 (or any other date as determined by the management committee to achieve the end-project milestone), to notify the Company that it does not wish to pursue production or commercialization of renewable diesel under the Amendment. If Total exercises this right, all of Total's intellectual property rights that were developed during the renewable diesel program would terminate and would be assigned to the Company, and the Company would be obligated to pay Total specified royalties based on the Company's net income in consideration of the benefits the Company derived from the technology and intellectual property developed during the renewable diesel development project. Such royalty payments would commence on the royalty notification date and end on the date when the Company had paid Total an aggregate amount equal to $150.0 million . The Company will pay Total a royalty of twenty percent ( 20% ) of Net Income on a yearly basis derived from (i) any licenses under or sales of the Diesel Collaboration IP by the Company or any of its Affiliates to third parties, but not to the extent such licenses or sale relate to the use of the Diesel Collaboration IP for the Initial Non-Exclusive JV Products, and (ii) the Net Income (as defined in the Agreement) of the Company on a consolidated basis other than that derived from a Product resulting from the Biojet Development Program and the Non-Exclusive JV Products (the “Total Diesel IP Royalty”).

In addition, in the event the Company sells all or substantially all of its renewable diesel business prior to the time the aggregate royalty amount has been paid, the Company shall pay Total fifty percent ( 50% ) of the net proceeds from such sale up to the then-remaining unpaid amount of the aggregate royalty amount. Net income shall be calculated in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles consistently applied by the Company and in the event that the foregoing net income is negative for a given fiscal quarter, the Company shall not be required to pay any royalty for such fiscal quarter). Beginning on the sixth year from the royalty notification date, the aforementioned royalty shall be additionally derived from the non-exclusive JV products.

20




The Company concluded that there is a significant amount of risk associated with the development of these products and therefore the arrangement is within the scope of ASC 730-20 Research and Development. The Company also determined that until Total exercises its royalty option, it is uncertain that financial risk involved with research and development is transferred from the Company to Total. Accordingly, the funds received from Total for the diesel product R&D activities were recorded as contingently repayable advance from the collaborator as part of other liabilities as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 . Depending on the resolution of Total's royalty option contingency, the Company will record this arrangement as a contract to perform research and development services or as an obligation to repay the funds.


5. Commitments and Contingencies

Capital Leases

In March 2008, the Company executed an equipment financing agreement intended to cover certain qualifying research and laboratory hardware and software. In January 2009, the agreement was amended to increase the financing amount. During the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010, and 2009, the Company financed certain purchases of hardware equipment and software of approximately zero , $1.4 million and $4.8 million , respectively. Pursuant to the equipment financing agreement, the Company financed the equipment with the transactions representing capital leases. Accordingly, fixed assets and capital lease liabilities were recorded at the present values of the future lease payments of $2.3 million and $3.1 million at March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 . The incremental borrowing rates used to determine the present values of the future lease payments was 9.5% . The capital lease obligations expire at various dates, with the latest maturity in March 2013. In connection with the agreement entered into in 2008, the Company issued a warrant to purchase shares of the Company's convertible preferred stock (see Note 11).

In December 2011, the Company executed an equipment financing agreement intended to cover certain qualifying research and laboratory hardware. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company financed certain purchases of hardware equipment of $3.0 million . Pursuant to the equipment financing agreement, the Company financed the equipment with transactions representing capital leases. This sale/leaseback transaction resulted in a $1.3 million unrealized loss which is being amortized over the life of the assets under lease. Accordingly, the Company recorded a capital lease liability at the present value of the future lease payments of $2.9 million at March 31, 2012 and $3.4 million at December 31, 2011 The incremental borrowing rate used to determine the present values of the future lease payments was 6.5% . The lease obligations expire on January 1, 2015 . In connection with the equipment financing transaction, the Company issued a warrant to purchase shares of the Company's common stock (see Note 11). Future minimum payments under this sales/leaseback agreement as of March 31, 2012 are as follows (in thousands):
Years ending December 31:
Sale/Leaseback
2012 (Nine Months)
$
823

2013
1,098

2014
1,007

2015
289

2016

Thereafter

Total future minimum lease payments
3,217

Less: amount representing interest
(296
)
Present value of minimum lease payments
2,921

Less: current portion
(935
)
Long-term portion
$
1,986

The Company recorded interest expense in connection with its capital leases of $133,000 and $166,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , respectively. Future minimum payments under capital leases, including the sale/leaseback equipment financing agreement, as of March 31, 2012 are as follows (in thousands):
 

21



Years ending December 31:
Capital Leases
2012 (Nine Months)
$
2,885

2013
1,489

2014
1,006

2015
289

2016

Thereafter

Total future minimum lease payments
5,669

Less: amount representing interest
(423
)
Present value of minimum lease payments
5,246

Less: current portion
(3,260
)
Long-term portion
$
1,986


Operating Leases

The Company has noncancelable operating lease agreements for office, research and development and manufacturing space in the United States that expire at various dates, with the latest expiration in May 2018 with an estimated annual rent payment of approximately $6.0 million . In addition, the Company leases facilities in Brazil pursuant to noncancelable operating leases that expire at various dates, with the latest expiration in November 2016 and with an estimated annual rent payment of approximately $0.6 million .

In 2007, the Company entered into an operating lease for its headquarters in Emeryville, California, with a term of ten years commencing in May 2008. As part of the operating lease agreement, the Company received a tenant improvements allowance of $11.4 million . The Company recorded the allowance as deferred rent and associated expenditures as leasehold improvements that are being amortized over the shorter of their useful life or the term of the lease. In connection with the operating lease, the Company elected to defer a portion of the monthly base rent due under the lease and entered into notes payable agreements with the lessor for the purchase of certain tenant improvements. In October 2010, the Company amended its lease agreement with the lessor of its headquarters, to lease up to approximately 22,000 square feet of research and development and office space. In return for the removal of the early termination clause in its amended lease agreement, the Company received approximately $1.0 million from the lessor in December 2010.

The Company recognizes rent expense on a straight-line basis over the noncancelable lease term and records the difference between cash rent payments and the recognition of rent expense as a deferred rent liability. Where leases contain escalation clauses, rent abatements, and/or concession, such as rent holidays and landlord or tenant incentives or allowances, the Company applies them in the determination of straight-line rent expense over the lease term. Rent expense was $1.2 million and $1.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , respectively.

The Company has agreements with terminal storage facility vendors for the storage and handling of products. As of March 31, 2012 the Company had $0.3 million in outstanding commitments under these terminalling agreements which are expected to be paid in 2012.
 
In January 2011, the Company entered into a right of first refusal agreement with respect to a facility and site in Leland, North Carolina leased by Glycotech covering a two year period commencing in January 2011. Under the right of first refusal agreement, the lessor agrees not to sell the facility and site leased by Glycotech during the term of the production service agreement. If the lessor is presented with an offer to sell, or decides to sell, an adjacent parcel, the Company has a right of first refusal to acquire the adjacent parcel or leased property.

In February 2011, the Company commenced payment of rent related to an operating lease on real property owned by Usina São Martinho in Brazil. In conjunction with a joint venture agreement (see Note 7) with the same entity, the real property will be used by the joint venture entity, SMA Indústria Química S.A. (“SMA”), for the construction of a production facility. This lease has a term of 20 years commencing in February 2011 with an estimated annual rent payment of approximately $54,000 .

In February 2011, the Company entered into an operating lease for certain equipment owned by GEA Engenharia de Processos e Sistemas Industriais Ltda (“GEA”) in Brazil. The equipment under this lease is used by the Company in its production activities in Brazil. This lease had a term of one year commencing in March 2011 with an estimated annual rent payment of approximately $88,000 and is renewable for up to two years from the end of the initial term. The Company is currently negotiating an extension

22



to the lease term.

In March 2011, the Company entered into an operating lease on real property owned by Paraíso Bioenergia S.A. (“Paraíso Bioenergia”) in Brazil. In conjunction with a supply agreement (see Note 9) with the same entity, the real property will be used by the Company for the construction of an industrial facility. This lease has a term of 15 years commencing in March 2011 with an estimated annual rent payment of approximately $136,000 .

In August 2011, the Company notified the lessor of its leased office facilities in Brazil of the Company's termination of its existing lease effective November 30, 2011. At the same time, the Company entered into an operating lease for new office facilities in Campinas, Brazil. The new lease has a term of 5 years commencing in November 2011 with an estimated annual rent payment of approximately $431,000 .

Future minimum payments under operating leases as of March 31, 2012 , are as follows (in thousands):

Years ending December 31:
 
Operating
Leases -
Facilities
 
Operating
Leases -
Land
 
Total
Operating
Leases
2012 (Nine Months)
$
4,939

 
$
142

 
$
5,081

2013
6,288

 
190

 
6,478

2014
6,372

 
190

 
6,562

2015
6,550

 
190

 
6,740

2016
6,681

 
190

 
6,871

Thereafter
9,237

 
2,018

 
11,255

Total future minimum lease payments
$
40,067

 
$
2,920

 
$
42,987


Guarantor Arrangements

The Company has agreements whereby it indemnifies its officers and directors for certain events or occurrences while the officer or director is, or was, serving at the Company’s request in such capacity. The term of the indemnification period is for the officer or director’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments the Company could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; however, the Company has a director and officer insurance policy that limits its exposure and enables the Company to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. As a result of its insurance policy coverage, the Company believes the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements is minimal. Accordingly, the Company had no liabilities recorded for these agreements as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 .

The Company has an uncommitted facility letter (“Credit Agreement”) with a financial institution to finance the purchase and sale of fuel and for working capital requirements, as needed. The Company is a parent guarantor for the payment of the outstanding balance under the Credit Agreement. As of March 31, 2012 , the Company had $0.7 million in outstanding letters of credit under the Credit Agreement which are guaranteed by the Company and payable on demand. The Credit Agreement is collateralized by a first priority security interest in certain of the Company’s present and future assets.

The Company has a credit facility (“BNDES Credit Facility”) with a financial institution to finance a production site in Brazil. This credit facility is collateralized by a first priority security interest in certain of the Company's equipment and other tangible assets totaling R$24.9 million reais (approximately US$13.7 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ). The Company is a parent guarantor for the payment of the outstanding balance under the BNDES Credit Facility. As of March 31, 2012 , the Company had US$10.5 million outstanding under the agreement. Additionally, the Company is required to provide a bank guarantee under the BNDES Credit Facility.
 
The Company has a facility (“FINEP Credit Facility”) with a financial institution to finance a research and development project on sugarcane-based biodiesel (see Note 6). The FINEP Credit Facility provides for loans of up to an aggregate principal amount of R$6.4 million reais (approximately US$3.5 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ) which is guaranteed by a chattel mortgage on certain equipment of the Company. The Company's total acquisition cost for the equipment under this guarantee is approximately R$6.0 million reais (approximately US$3.3 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ). Subject to compliance with certain terms and conditions under the FINEP Credit Facility, four disbursements of the loan will become available to the Company for withdrawal, as described in more detail in Note 6. After the release of the first disbursement, prior to any subsequent drawdown from the FINEP Credit Facility, the Company also needs to provide bank letters of guarantee

23



of up to R$3.3 million reais (approximately US$1.8 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ).

The Company has an agreement with a terminal storage facility vendor for storing and handling of products. The Company is a parent guarantor for the payment of the outstanding balance under this terminalling agreement. As of March 31, 2012 , the Company had $47,000 in outstanding commitments under this terminalling agreement which are guaranteed by the Company and payable on demand.

Under an operating lease agreement for its office facilities in Brazil, which commenced on November 15, 2011, the Company is required to maintain restricted cash or letters of credit equal to three months rent of approximately R$191,000 reais (approximately US$105,000 based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ) as guarantee that the Company will meet its performance obligations under such operating lease agreement.

Other Matters

The Company is not involved in any legal proceedings that management believes will have a material adverse effect on its business, results of operations, financial position or cash flows. The Company may be involved, from time to time, in legal proceedings and claims arising in the ordinary course of its business. Such matters are subject to many uncertainties and outcomes are not predictable with assurance. The Company accrues amounts, to the extent they can be reasonably estimated, that it believes are adequate to address any liabilities related to legal proceedings and other loss contingencies that the Company believes will result in a probable loss.

 

6. Debt

Debt is comprised of the following (in thousands):
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Credit facilities
$
19,182

 
$
18,852

Notes payable
27,813

 
3,113

Loans payable
19,505

 
19,359

Total debt
66,500

 
41,324

Less: current portion
(29,015
)
 
(28,049
)
Long-term debt
$
37,485

 
$
13,275


Credit Facility

In November 2010, the Company entered into the FINEP Credit Facility with Financiadora de Estudos e Projetos (“FINEP”), a state-owned company subordinated to the Brazilian Ministry of Science and Technology. This FINEP Credit Facility was extended to partially fund expenses related to the Company’s research and development project on sugarcane-based biodiesel (“FINEP Project”) and provides for loans of up to an aggregate principal amount of R$6.4 million reais (approximately US$3.5 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ) which is guaranteed by a chattel mortgage on certain equipment of the Company as well as bank letters of guarantee. Subject to compliance with certain terms and conditions under the FINEP Credit Facility, four disbursements of the loan will become available to the Company for withdrawal. The first disbursement received in February 2011 was approximately R$1.8 million reais and the next three disbursements will each be approximately R$1.6 million reais. As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 there were R$1.8 million reais (approximately US$1.0 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ) outstanding under this FINEP Credit Facility.

Interest on loans drawn under this credit facility is fixed at 5.0%  per annum. In case of default under or non-compliance with the terms of the agreement, the interest on loans will be dependent on the long-term interest rate as published by the Central Bank of Brazil (“TJLP”). If the TJLP at the time of default is greater than 6.0% , then the interest will be 5.0% + a TJLP adjustment factor, otherwise the interest will be at 11.0%  per annum. In addition, a fine of up to 10.0% shall apply to the amount of any obligation in default. Interest on late balances will be 1.0% interest per month, levied on the overdue amount. Payment of the outstanding loan balance will be made in 81 monthly installments which will commence in July 2012 and extend through March 2019. Interest on loans drawn and other charges are paid on a monthly basis commencing in March 2011.

The FINEP Credit Facility contains the following significant terms and conditions


24



The Company will share with FINEP the costs associated with the FINEP Project. At a minimum, the Company will contribute from its own funds approximately R$14.5 million reais ( US$8.0 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ) of which the Company expects R$11.1 million reais to be contributed prior to the release of the second disbursement, which is expected to occur in 2012;  
After the release of the first disbursement, prior to any subsequent drawdown from the FINEP Credit Facility, the Company is required to provide bank letters of guarantee of up to R$3.3 million reais in aggregate (approximately US$1.8 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 );
Amounts released from the FINEP Credit Facility must be completely used by the Company towards the FINEP Project within 30 months after the contract execution.

Notes Payable

During the period between May 2008 and October 2008, the Company entered into notes payable agreements with the lessor of its headquarters under which it borrowed a total of $3.3 million for the purchase of tenant improvements, bearing an interest rate of 9.5%  per annum and to be repaid over a period of 55 to 120 months. As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , a principal amount of $1.9 million and $2.0 million , respectively, was outstanding under these notes payable.

In connection with the operating lease for its headquarters (see Note 5) in Emeryville, California, the Company elected to defer a portion of monthly base rent due under the lease. In June 2011, a deferred rent obligation of $1.5 million resulting from this election became due and payable in 24 equal monthly installments of approximately $63,000 . As such, the Company reclassified this obligation from Other Liabilities to Notes Payable. As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , a principal amount of $0.9 million and $1.1 million , respectively, was outstanding under this note payable.

Convertible Notes

In February 2012, the Company completed the sale of unsecured senior convertible promissory notes in an aggregate principal amount of $25.0 million pursuant to a Securities Purchase Agreement, between the Company and certain investment funds affiliated with Fidelity Investments Institutional Services Company, Inc. The offering consisted of the sale of 3% senior unsecured convertible promissory notes with a March 1, 2017 maturity date and a conversion price equal to $7.0682 per share of common stock, (an 18.0% premium to market value determined under the governance rules of The NASDAQ Stock Market) subject to adjustment for proportional adjustments to outstanding common stock and anti-dilution provisions in case of dividends and distributions. As of the closing of the offering, the notes were convertible into an aggregate of up to 3,536,968 shares of common stock. The conversion price of the Notes is subject to adjustment for proportional adjustments to outstanding common stock and under anti-dilution provisions in case of certain dividends and distributions. The note holders have a right to require repayment of 101% of the principal amount of the notes in an acquisition of the Company, and the notes provide for payment of unpaid interest on conversion following such an acquisition if the note holders do not require such repayment.  The securities purchase agreement and notes include covenants regarding payment of interest, maintaining our listing status, limitations on debt, maintenance of corporate existence, and filing of SEC reports. The notes include standard events of default resulting in acceleration of indebtedness, including failure to pay, bankruptcy and insolvency, cross-defaults, material adverse effect clauses and breaches of the covenants in the securities purchase agreement and notes, with default interest rates and associated cure periods applicable to the covenant regarding SEC reporting. In connection with the offering the Company entered into a Registration Rights Agreement with the note purchasers.

Loans Payable

In December 2009, the Company entered into a loans payable agreement with the lessor of its Emeryville pilot plant under which it borrowed a total of $250,000 , bearing an interest rate of 10.0%  per annum and to be repaid over a period of 96  months. As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , a principal amount of $197,000 and $204,000 , respectively, was outstanding under the loan.

In December 2011, the Company entered into a loan agreement with Banco Pine S.A. under which Banco Pine S.A. provided the Company with a short term loan of R$35.0 million reais (approximately US$19.2 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ) (the “Bridge Loan”). The Bridge Loan was an advance on anticipated 2012 financing from Nossa Caixa Desenvolvimento, ("Nossa Caixa"), the Sao Paulo State development bank, and the Lender, under which the Lender and Nossa Caxia may provide the Company with loans of up to approximately R$52.0 million reais (approximately US$28.5 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ) as financing for capital expenditures relating to the Company's manufacturing facility,Paraíso Bioenergia in Brazil. The interest rate for the Bridge Loan is 119.2% of Brazilian interbank lending rate (approximately 12.3% on an annualized basis). The principal and interest of loans under the Loan Agreement matured and were

25



required to be repaid on February 17, 2012, subject to extension by the Lender. On February 17, 2012, the Company entered into a supplemental agreement with Banco Pine S.A. under which the parties agreed to extend the maturity date for the repayment of the original loan entered into on December 22, 2011 from February 17, 2012 to May 17, 2012. In connection with the extension, the Company is obligated to pay R$129,150 (approximately US$71,000 based on the exchange rate as of March 31, 2012 ) as tax on the financial transaction as required by Brazilian law. Under the Loan Agreement, the Company owes a prepayment penalty if it repays the loan prior to the maturity date based on the net value of the loan to Banco Pine S.A. if the Bridge Loan were repaid on the maturity date.
The Bridge Loan agreement includes customary events of default, including refusal to perform responsibilities under the Loan Agreement, failure to make payments when due, bankruptcy, liquidation or insolvency, and material judgments. If any event of default under the Bridge Loan occurs, the Lender may declare all borrowings under the Bridge Loan immediately due. As of March 31, 2012 , a total of R$35.0 million reais was advanced under the Bridge Loan and a principal amount of US$19.2 million was outstanding under this loan.

Letters of Credit

In November 2008, the Company entered into the Credit Agreement with a financial institution to finance the purchase and sale of fuel and for working capital requirements, as needed. In October 2009, the agreement was amended to decrease the maximum amount that the Company may borrow under such facility. The Credit Agreement, as amended, provided, as of March 31, 2012, for an aggregate maximum availability up to the lower of $20.0 million and the borrowing base as defined in the agreement, and is subject to a sub-limit of $5.7 million for the issuance of letters of credit and a sub-limit of $20.0 million for short-term cash advances for product purchases. The Credit Agreement is collateralized by a first priority security interest in certain of the Company’s present and future assets. Amyris is a parent guarantor for the payment of the outstanding balance under the Credit Agreement. Outstanding advances bear an interest rate at the Company’s option of the bank’s prime rate plus 1.0% or the bank’s cost of funds plus 3.5% . As of March 31, 2012 , the Company had sufficient borrowing base levels to draw down up to a total of $6.1 million in short term cash advances and $5.0 million available for letters of credit in addition to those outstanding as of March 31, 2012 . As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , the Company had no outstanding advances and had $0.7 million and $5.0 million in outstanding letters of credit under the Credit Agreement.

To the extent that amounts under the Credit Agreement remain unused while the Credit Agreement is in effect and for so long thereafter as any of the obligations under the Credit Agreement are outstanding, the Company will pay an annual commitment fee of $300,000 . The Credit Agreement requires compliance with certain customary covenants that require maintenance of certain specified financial ratios and conditions. As of March 31, 2012 , the Company was in compliance with its financial covenants under the Credit Agreement.

The Credit Agreement was amended in April 2012 to adjust the borrowing limits and maturity date (see Note 17).

Revolving Credit Facility

On December 23, 2010, the Company established a revolving credit facility with a financial institution which provides for loans and standby letters of credit of up to an aggregate principal amount of $10.0 million with a sublimit of $5.0 million on standby letters of credit. Interest on loans drawn under this revolving credit facility is equal to (i) the Eurodollar Rate plus 3.0% ; or (ii) the Prime Rate plus 0.5% . In case of default or non-compliance with the terms of the agreement, the interest on loans is Prime Rate plus 2.0% . The credit facility is collateralized by a first priority security interest in certain of the Company's present and future assets. It has a $5,000 annual loan fee and contains the following significant financial and non-financial covenants:

The Company is required to comply with the following financial covenants under the credit facility: it must maintain a liquidity of at least $10.0 million plus two times its quarterly “Net Cash Used in Operating Activities” calculated using the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows reflected in the Company’s most recent periodic report filed with the SEC. In addition, as of the end of each fiscal quarter, the Company must maintain a current ratio (current assets to current liabilities) equal to or greater than 2 :1. As of March 31, 2012 , the Company was not in compliance with either the liquidity or the current ratio covenant. Events of default under the credit facility provides the lender various rights, including the right to require immediate repayment or foreclose on collateral may result in acceleration of payment, which would result in cross defaults under other debt instruments, including the convertible promissory notes described above.

Under this facility, $7.7 million of loans and one letter of credit totaling $2.3 million was outstanding as of March 31, 2012 . The outstanding letter of credit serves as security for a facility lease and expires in November 2012 and may be automatically extended for another one -year period.


26



BNDES Credit Facility

In December 2011, the Company entered into a credit facility (the "BNDES Credit Facility") in the amount of R$22.4 million reais (approximately US $12.3 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ) with Banco Nacional de Desenvolvimento Econômico e Social ("BNDES”), a government owned bank headquartered in Brazil. This BNDES facility was extended as project financing for a production site in Brazil. The credit line is divided into an initial tranche for up to approximately R$19.1 million reais and an additional tranche of approximately R$3.3 million reais that becomes available upon delivery of additional guarantees. The credit line is available for 12 months from the date of the Credit Agreement, subject to extension by the lender.
The principal of the loans under the BNDES Credit Facility is required to be repaid in 60 monthly installments, with the first installment due in January 2013 and the last due in December 2017. Interest will be due initially on a quarterly basis with the first installment due in March 2012. From and after January 2013, interest payments will be due on a monthly basis together with principal payments. The loaned amounts carry interest of 7%  per year. Additionally, a credit reserve charge of 0.1% on the unused balance from each credit installment from the day immediately after it is made available through its date of use, when it is paid.

The BNDES Credit Facility is denominated in Brazilian Reais and will not change until the effective release. The credit facility is collateralized by a first priority security interest in certain of the Company's equipment and other tangible assets totaling R$24.9 million reais (approximately US $13.7 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ). The Company is a parent guarantor for the payment of the outstanding balance under the BNDES Credit Facility. Additionally, the Company is required to provide a bank guarantee equal to 10% of the total approved amount ( R$22.4 million reais in total debt) available under the this credit facility. For advances in the second tranche (above R$19.1 million reais), the Company is required to provide additional bank guarantees equal to 90% of each such advance, plus additional Company guarantees equal to at least 130% of such advance. The BNDES Credit Facility contains customary events of default, including payment failures, failure to satisfy other obligations under this credit facility or related documents, defaults in respect of other indebtedness, bankruptcy, insolvency and inability to pay debts when due, material judgments, and changes in control of Amyris Brasil. If any event of default occurs, the Lender may terminate its commitments and declare immediately due all borrowings under the facility. As of March 31, 2012 the Company had R$19.1 million reais (approximately US$10.5 million based on the exchange rate at March 31, 2012 ) in outstanding advances under the BNDES Credit Facility.

Future minimum payments under the debt agreements as of March 31, 2012 are as follows (in thousands):

Years ending December 31:
Notes Payable
 
Loans Payable
 
Credit Facility
2012 (Nine Months)
$
1,111

 
$
19,539

 
$
8,636

2013
846

 
144

 
2,935

2014
431

 
45

 
2,784

2015
431

 
45

 
2,621

2016
431

 
45

 
2,495

Thereafter
25,492

 
44

 
2,528

Total future minimum payments
28,742

 
19,862

 
21,999

Less: amount representing interest
(929
)
 
(357
)
 
(2,817
)
Present value of minimum debt payments
27,813

 
19,505

 
19,182

Less: current portion
(1,231
)
 
(19,335
)
 
(8,449
)
Noncurrent portion of debt
$
26,582

 
$
170

 
$
10,733



7. Joint Ventures

SMA Indústria Química S.A.

On April 14, 2010, the Company established SMA, a joint venture with Usina São Martinho, to build a manufacturing facility. SMA is located at the Usina São Martinho mill in Pradópolis, São Paulo state, Brazil. SMA has a 20 year initial term.

SMA is managed by a three member executive committee, of which the Company appoints two members one of whom is the plant manager who is the most senior executive responsible for managing the construction and operation of the facility. SMA is governed by a four member board of directors, of which the Company and Usina São Martinho each appoint two members. The board of directors has certain protective rights which include final approval of the engineering designs and project work plan

27



developed and recommended by the executive committee.

The joint venture agreements require the Company to fund the construction costs of the new facility and Usina São Martinho would reimburse the Company up to R $61.8 million reais (approximately US $33.9 million based on the exchange rate as of March 31, 2012 ) of the construction costs after SMA commences production. Post commercialization, the Company would market and distribute Amyris renewable products and Usina São Martinho would sell feedstock and provide certain other services to SMA. The cost of the feedstock to SMA would be a price that is based on the average return that Usina São Martinho could receive from the production of its current products, sugar and ethanol. The Company would be required to purchase the output of SMA for the first four years at a price that guarantees the return of Usina São Martinho’s investment plus a fixed interest rate. After this four year period, the price would be set to guarantee a break-even price to SMA plus an agreed upon return.

Under the terms of the joint venture agreements, if the Company becomes controlled, directly or indirectly, by a competitor of Usina São Martinho, then Usina São Martinho has the right to acquire the Company’s interest in SMA. If Usina São Martinho becomes controlled, directly or indirectly, by a competitor of the Company, then the Company has the right to sell its interest in SMA to Usina São Martinho. In either case, the purchase price is determined in accordance with the joint venture agreements, and the Company would continue to have the obligation to acquire products produced by SMA for the remainder of the term of the supply agreement then in effect even though the Company would no longer be involved in SMA’s management.

Amyris has a 50% ownership interest in SMA. The Company has identified SMA as a VIE. The Company is the primary beneficiary and consequently consolidates SMA’s operations in its financial statements.

Joint Venture with Cosan

In June 2011, the Company entered into joint venture agreements with Cosan Combustíveis e Lubrificantes S.A. and Cosan S.A. Industria e Comércio (such Cosan entities, collectively or individually, “Cosan”), related to the formation of a joint venture (the “JV”), to focus on the worldwide development, production and commercialization of base oils made from Biofene produced by the JV or purchased from the Company or a contract manufacturer. The Company and Cosan are establishing entities related to the joint venture in both Brazil and the United States.

Under the joint venture agreements, the JV would undertake, on a worldwide basis, the development, production and commercialization of certain classes of base oils produced from Biofene for use in lubricants products in the automotive, commercial and industrial markets. The agreements provide that (i) the Company will perform research and development activities on behalf of the JV under a research services arrangement and will grant a royalty-free license to the JV to use the Company's technology to develop, produce, market and distribute renewable base oils for use in lubricant products sold worldwide, and (ii) Cosan will provide technical expertise and use commercially reasonable efforts to contribute a base oils offtake agreement with a third party to the JV.

Subject to certain exceptions for the Company, the joint venture agreements provide that the JV will be the exclusive means through which the Company and Cosan will engage in the worldwide development and commercialization of specified classes of renewable base oils that are derived from Biofene or, under certain circumstances, from other intermediate molecules or technologies. The JV has certain rights of first refusal with respect to alternative base oil technologies that may be acquired by the Company or Cosan during the term of the JV.

Under the joint venture agreements, the Company and Cosan each own 50% of the JV and each party will share equally in any costs and any profits ultimately realized by the JV. The joint venture agreement has an initial term of 20 years from the date of the agreement, subject to earlier termination by mutual written consent or by a non-defaulting party in the event of specified defaults by the other party (including breach by a party of any material obligations under the joint venture agreements). The Shareholders' Agreement has an initial term of 10 years from the date of the agreement, subject to earlier termination if either the Company or Cosan ceases to own at least 10% of the voting stock of the JV.

The Company has identified Novvi S.A., the initial Brazilian JV entity formed, as a VIE. The power to direct activities, which most significantly impact the economic success of the joint venture, is equally shared between the Company and Cosan, who are not related parties. Accordingly, the Company is not the primary beneficiary and therefore will account for its investment in the JV entity using the equity method. The Company will periodically review its consolidation analysis on an ongoing basis. As of March 31, 2012 , the carrying amounts of the unconsolidated JV entity's assets and liabilities were not material to the Company's consolidated financial statements.

In September 2011, the U.S. JV entity, Novvi LLC was formed. The Company and Cosan are still finalizing operating

28



agreements for this new entity. Through March 31, 2012 , there has been no activity in this joint venture.


8. Noncontrolling Interest

Redeemable Noncontrolling Interest

In December 2009, Amyris Brasil sold 1,111,111 of its shares representing a 4.8% interest in Amyris Brasil for R$ 10.0 million reais. The redeemable noncontrolling interest was reported in the mezzanine equity section of the consolidated balance sheet because the Company was then subject to a contingent put option under which it could have been required to repurchase an interest in Amyris Brasil from the noncontrolling interest holder.

In March 2010, Amyris Brasil sold an additional 853,333 shares of its stock, an incremental 3.4% interest, for R$ 3.0 million reais. In May 2010, Amyris Brasil sold an additional 1,111,111 shares of its stock, an incremental 4.07% interest, for R$ 10.0 million reais.

Under the terms of the agreements with these Amyris Brasil investors, the Company had the right to require the investors to convert their shares of Amyris Brasil into shares of common stock at a 1: 0.28 conversion ratio. On September 30, 2010, in connection with the Company’s IPO, shares of Amyris Brasil held by these investors were converted into 861,155 shares of the Company’s common stock. The remaining noncontrolling interest as of September 30, 2010 was converted to common stock and additional paid-in capital.

At the closing of the IPO, the Company recorded a one-time beneficial conversion feature charge of $2.7 million associated with the conversion of the shares of Amyris Brasil held by investors into shares of Amyris, Inc. common stock, which impacted earnings per share for the year ended December 31, 2010.

The following table provides a roll forward of the redeemable noncontrolling interest (in thousands):
 
Balance as of December 31, 2009
$
5,506

Proceeds from redeemable noncontrolling interest
7,041

Conversion of shares of Amyris Brasil S.A. subsidiary held by third parties into common stock
(11,870
)
Foreign currency translation adjustment
217

Net loss
(894
)
Balance as of December 31, 2010
$


Noncontrolling Interest

SMA Indústria Química
The joint venture, SMA (see Note 7), is a VIE pursuant to the accounting guidance for consolidating VIEs because the amount of total equity investment at risk is not sufficient to permit SMA to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support, as well as the related commercialization agreement provides a substantive minimum price guarantee. Under the terms of the joint venture agreement, the Company directs the design and construction activities, as well as production and distribution. In addition, the Company has the obligation to fund the design and construction activities until commercialization is achieved. Subsequent to the construction phase, both parties equally fund SMA for the term of the joint venture. Based on those factors, the Company was determined to have the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact SMA’s economic performance and the obligation to absorb losses and the right to receive benefits. Accordingly, the financial results of SMA are included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements and amounts pertaining to Usina São Martinho’s interest in SMA are reported as noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries.

Glycotech

On January 3, 2011, the Company entered into a production service agreement with Glycotech, whereby Glycotech is to provide process development and production services for the manufacturing of various Amyris products at its leased facility in Leland, North Carolina. The Amyris products to be manufactured by Glycotech will be owned and distributed by the Company. Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, the Company will pay the manufacturing and operating costs of the Glycotech facility which is dedicated solely to the manufacture of Amyris products. The initial term of the agreement is for a two year period

29



commencing on February 1, 2011 and will renew automatically for successive one -year terms, unless terminated by Amyris. On the same date as the production service agreement, the Company also entered into a right of first refusal agreement with the lessor of the facility and site leased by Glycotech covering a two year period commencing in January 2011. Per the terms of the right of first refusal agreement the lessor agrees not to sell the facility and site leased by Glycotech during the term of the production service agreement. In the event that the lessor is presented with an offer to sell or decides to sell an adjacent parcel, the Company has the right of first refusal to acquire it.

The Company has determined that the arrangement with Glycotech qualifies as a VIE. The Company determined that it is the primary beneficiary of this arrangement since it has the power through the management committee over which it has majority control to direct the activities that most significantly impact the arrangement's economic performance. In addition, the Company is required to fund 100% of Glycotech's actual operating costs for providing services each month while the facility is in operation under the production service agreement. Accordingly, the Company consolidates the financial results of Glycotech. As of March 31, 2012 , the carrying amounts of the consolidated VIE's assets and liabilities were not material to the Company's consolidated financial statements.

The table below reflects the carrying amount of the assets and liabilities of the two consolidated VIEs for which the Company is the primary beneficiary. The assets include $20.1 million in property and equipment and $6.5 million in other assets, and $0.4 million in current assets. The liabilities include $1.4 million in accounts payable and accrued current liabilities and $0.1 million in loan obligations by Glycotech to a financial institution that are non-recourse to the Company. The creditors of each consolidated VIE have recourse only to the assets of that VIE.

(In thousands)
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Assets
$
26,985

 
$
22,094

Liabilities
$
1,502

 
$
2,873


The change in noncontrolling interest for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 is summarized below (in thousands):
 
2012
 
2011
Balance at January 1
$
(240
)
 
$
2

Addition to noncontrolling interest

 
346

Foreign currency translation adjustment
87

 

Loss attributable to noncontrolling interest
(348
)
 
(10
)
Balance at March 31
$
(501
)
 
$
338



9. Significant Agreements

Research and Development Activities

Total Collaboration Agreement

In June 2010, the Company entered into a technology license, development, research and collaboration agreement (“collaboration agreement”) with Total Gas & Power USA Biotech, Inc., an affiliate of Total S.A. (Total S.A. and its relevant affiliates, collectively, “Total”). The collaboration agreement sets forth the terms for the research, development, production and commercialization of certain to be determined chemical and/or fuel products made through the use of the Company’s synthetic biology platform. The collaboration agreement establishes a multi-phased process through which projects are identified, screened, studied for feasibility, and ultimately selected as a project for development of an identified lead compound using an identified microbial strain. Under the terms of the collaboration agreement, Total will fund up to the first $50.0 million in research and development costs for the selected projects; thereafter the parties will share such costs equally. Amyris has agreed to dedicate the laboratory resources needed for collaboration projects. Total also plans to second employees at Amyris to work on the projects. Once a development project has commenced, the parties are obligated to work together exclusively to develop the lead compound during the project development phase. After a development project is completed, the Company and Total expect to form one or more joint ventures to commercialize any products that are developed, with costs and profits to be shared on an equal basis, provided that if Total has not achieved profits from sales of a joint venture product equal to the amount of funding it provided for development plus an agreed upon rate of return within three years of commencing sales, then Total will be entitled to receive all

30



profits from sales until this rate of return has been achieved. Each party has certain rights to independently produce commercial quantities of these products under certain circumstances, subject to paying royalties to the other party. Total has the right of first negotiation with respect to exclusive commercialization arrangements that the Company would propose to enter into with certain third parties, as well as the right to purchase any of the Company’s products on terms no less favorable than those offered to or received by the Company from third parties in any market where Total or its affiliates have a significant market position.

The collaboration agreement has an initial term of 12 years and is renewable by mutual agreement by the parties for additional three year periods. Neither the Company nor Total has the right to terminate the agreement voluntarily. The Company and Total each have the right to terminate the agreement in the event the other party commits a material breach, is the subject of certain bankruptcy proceedings or challenges a patent licensed to it under the collaboration agreement. Total also has the right to terminate the collaboration agreement in the event the Company undergoes a sale or change of control to certain entities. If the Company terminates the collaboration agreement due to a breach, bankruptcy or patent challenge by Total, all licenses the Company has granted to Total terminate except licenses related to products for which Total has made a material investment and licenses related to products with respect to which binding commercialization arrangements have been approved, which will survive subject, in most cases, to the payment of certain royalties by Total to the Company. Similarly, if Total terminates the collaboration agreement due to a breach, bankruptcy or patent challenge by the Company, all licenses Total has granted to the Company terminate except licenses related to products for which the Company has made a material investment, certain grant-back licenses and licenses related to products with respect to which binding commercialization arrangements have been approved, which will survive subject, in most cases, to the payment of certain royalties to Total by the Company. On expiration of the collaboration agreement, or in the event the collaboration agreement is terminated for a reason other than a breach, bankruptcy or patent challenge by one party, licenses applicable to activities outside the collaboration generally continue with respect to intellectual property existing at the time of expiration or termination subject, in most cases, to royalty payments. There are circumstances under which certain of the licenses granted to Total will survive on a perpetual, royalty-free basis after expiration or termination of the collaboration agreement. Generally these involve licenses to use the Company’s synthetic biology technology and core metabolic pathway for purposes of either independently developing further improvements to marketed collaboration technologies or products or the processes for producing them within a specified scope agreed to by the Company and Total prior to the time of expiration or termination, or independently developing early stage commercializing products developed from collaboration compounds that met certain performance criteria prior to the time the agreement expired or was terminated and commercializing products related to such compounds. After the collaboration agreement expires, the Company may be obligated to provide Total with ongoing access to Amyris laboratory facilities to enable Total to complete research and development activities that commenced prior to termination.

In June 2010, concurrent with the collaboration agreement, the Company issued 7,101,548 shares of Series D preferred stock to Total for aggregate proceeds of approximately $133.0 million at a per share price of $18.75 , which was lower than the per share fair value of common stock as determined by management and the Board of Directors. Due to the fact the collaboration agreement and the issuance of shares to Total occurred concurrently, the terms of both the collaboration agreement and the issuance of preferred stock were evaluated to determine whether their separately stated pricing was equal to the fair value of services and preferred stock. The Company determined that the fair value of Series D preferred stock was $22.68 at the time of issuance, and therefore, the Company measured the preferred stock initially at its fair value with a corresponding reduction in the consideration for the services under the collaboration agreement. As revenue from collaboration agreement will be generated over a period of time based on the performance requirements, the Company recorded the difference between the fair value and consideration received for Series D preferred stock of $27.9 million as deferred charge asset within other assets at the time of issuance which will be recognized as a reduction to revenue in proportion to the total estimated revenue under the collaboration agreement. As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , the Company had recognized a cumulative reduction of $11.8 million and $9.1 million , respectively, against the deferred charge asset.

As a result of recording Series D preferred stock at its fair value, the effective conversion price was greater than the fair value of common stock as determined by management and the Board of Directors. Therefore, no beneficial conversion feature was recorded at the time of issuance. The Company further determined that the conversion option with a contingent reduction in the conversion price upon a qualified IPO was a potential contingent beneficial feature and, as a result, the Company calculated the intrinsic value of such conversion option upon occurrence of the qualified IPO. The Company determined that a contingent beneficial conversion feature existed and the Company recorded a charge within the equity section of its balance sheet, which impacted earnings per share for the year ended December 31, 2010, based upon the price at which shares were offered to the public in the IPO in relation to the adjustment provisions provided for the Series D preferred stock. Based on the IPO price of $16.00 per share, the charge to net loss attributable to Amyris’ common stockholders was $39.3 million .
 
In connection with Total’s equity investment, the Company agreed to appoint a person designated by Total to serve as a member of the Company’s Board of Directors in the class subject to the latest reelection date, and to use reasonable efforts, consistent with the Board of Directors’ fiduciary duties, to cause the director designated by Total to be re-nominated by the Board of Directors in the future. These membership rights terminate upon the earlier of Total holding less than half of the shares of

31



common stock originally issuable upon conversion of the Series D preferred stock or a sale of the Company.

The Company also agreed with Total that, so long as Total holds at least 10% of the Company’s voting securities, the Company will notify Total if the Company’s Board of Directors seeks to cause the sale of the Company or if the Company receives an offer to be acquired. In the event of such decision or offer, the Company must provide Total with all information given to an offering party and certain other information, and Total will have an exclusive negotiating period of 15 business days in the event the Board of Directors authorizes the Company to solicit offers to buy the Company, or five business days in the event that the Company receives an unsolicited offer to be acquired. This exclusive negotiation period will be followed by an additional restricted negotiation period of 10 business days, during which the Company will be obligated to negotiate with Total and will be prohibited from entering into an agreement with any other potential acquirer. Total has also entered into a standstill agreement pursuant to which it agreed for a period of three years not to acquire in excess of the greater of 20% or the number of shares of Series D preferred stock purchased by Total (during the initial two years) or 30% (during the third year) of the Company’s common stock without the prior consent of our Board of Directors, except that, among other things, if another person acquires more than Total’s then current holdings of the Company’s common stock, then Total may acquire up to that amount plus one share.

In November 2011, the Company and Total Gas & Power USA SAS (“Total”) entered into an amendment of the collaboration agreement.

The Amendment provides for an exclusive strategic collaboration for the development of renewable diesel products and contemplates that the parties will establish a joint venture (the “JV”) for the production and commercialization of such renewable diesel products on an exclusive, worldwide basis. It also provides that commercialization and production of jet fuel, already under development pursuant to the Collaboration Agreement, would be conducted on an exclusive, worldwide basis through the same JV. In addition, the amendment provides the JV with the right to produce and commercialize certain other chemical products on a non-exclusive basis. The Amendment provides that definitive agreements to form the JV must be in place by March 31, 2012 or other date as agreed to by the parties, or the renewable diesel program, including any further collaboration payments by Total related to the renewable diesel program, will terminate. The parties are currently engaged in discussion regarding the potential terms and timing of an extension to such date. The continuation of the renewable diesel program and the formation of the JV are also subject to certain mutual intellectual property due diligence conditions. Under the amendment, each party retains certain rights to independently produce and sell renewable diesel under specified circumstances subject to paying royalties to the other party.

Total has an option, upon completion of the renewable diesel program, to notify the Company that it does not wish to pursue production or commercialization of renewable diesel under the amendment. If Total exercises this right, all of Total's intellectual property rights that were developed during the renewable diesel program would terminate and would be assigned to the Company, and the Company would be obligated pay Total specified royalties based on the Company's net income. Such royalty payments would also include a share of net proceeds received by the Company from any sale of its renewable diesel business.

Pursuant to the amendment, Total has agreed to solely fund the following amounts: (i) the first $30.0 million in research and development costs related to the renewable diesel program which have been incurred since August 1, 2011, which amount shall be in addition to the $50.0 million in research and development funding contemplated by the Collaboration Agreement, and (ii) for any research and development costs incurred following the JV formation date that are not covered by the initial $30.0 million , up to an additional $10.0 million in 2012 and up to an additional $10.0 million in 2013, which amounts will be considered part of the $50.0 million contemplated by the Collaboration Agreement. In addition to these payments, Total has further agreed to fund 50%  of all remaining research and development costs for the renewable diesel program under the amendment. The parties have separately agreed that, if the JV is formed, Total will fund additional amounts with respect to JV expenditures.

M&G Finanziaria Collaboration Agreement

In June 2010, the Company entered into a collaboration agreement with M&G Finanziaria S.R.L. (“M&G”) to incorporate Biofene as an ingredient in M&G's polyethylene terephthalate, or PET, resins to be incorporated into containers for food, beverages and other products. In April 2011, Amyris and M&G entered into an amended and restated collaboration agreement to amend certain portions of the original agreement entered into in June 2010 and adding Chemtex Italia S.R.L. and Chemtex International Inc. (both wholly owned subsidiaries of M&G) to the collaboration agreement. Under the terms of the amended agreement, the Company and Chemtex International Inc. will share the costs incurred associated with the PET collaboration on a 50 / 50 basis. In addition, the amended agreement expanded the collaboration arrangement between the Company and M&G to include a cellulosic feasibility study with each party bearing its own costs associated with such feasibility study. The collaboration agreement also establishes the terms under which M&G may purchase Biofene from the Company upon successful completion of product integration.


32



Firmenich Collaboration and Joint Development Agreements

In November 2010, the Company entered into collaboration and joint development agreements with Firmenich SA (“Firmenich”), a flavors and fragrances company based in Geneva, Switzerland. Under the agreement, Firmenich will fund technical development at the Company to produce an ingredient for the flavors and fragrances market. The Company will manufacture the ingredient and Firmenich will market it, and the parties will share in any resulting economic value. The agreement also grants worldwide exclusive flavors and fragrances commercialization rights to Firmenich for the ingredient. In addition, Firmenich has an option to collaborate with the Company to develop a second ingredient. In July 2011, the Company and Firmenich expanded their collaboration agreement to include a third ingredient. The collaboration and joint development agreements will continue in effect until the later of the expiration or termination of the development agreements or the supply agreements. The Company is also eligible to receive potential total payments of $6.0 million upon the achievement of certain performance milestones towards which the Company will be required to make a contributory performance. These milestones are accounted for under the guidance in the FASB accounting standard update related to revenue recognition under the milestone method. The Company concluded that these milestones are substantive. For the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , the Company recorded $750,000 and $682,000 , respectively, of revenue from the collaboration agreement with Firmenich.

Michelin Collaboration Agreement

In September 2011, the Company entered into a collaboration agreement with Manufacture Francaise des Pneumatiques Michelin (“Michelin”). Under the terms of the collaboration agreement the Company and Michelin will collaborate on the development, production and worldwide commercialization of isoprene or isoprenol, generally for tire applications, using the Company's technology. Under the agreement, Michelin has agreed to pay an upfront payment to the Company of $5.0 million , subject to a reimbursement provision under which the Company would have to repay $1.0 million if it fails to achieve specified future technical milestones. The agreement provides that, subject to achievement of technical milestones, Michelin can notify the Company of its desired date for initial delivery, and the parties will either collaborate to establish a production facility or use an existing Company facility for production. The agreement also includes a term sheet for a supply agreement that would be negotiated at the time the decision regarding production facilities is made. The agreement has an initial term that will expire upon the earlier of 42 months from the effective date and the completion of a development work plan. As of March 31, 2012 , the Company recorded the upfront payment of $5.0 million from Michelin as deferred revenue.

Manufacturing Agreements

In 2010 and 2011, the Company entered into contract manufacturing agreements with Biomin do Brasil Nutricão Animal Ltda. (“Biomin”), Tate & Lyle Ingredients Americas, Inc. (“Tate & Lyle”), Antibióticos, S.A. (“Antibióticos”), Albemarle Corporation ("Albemarle"), and Glycotech (see Note 8) to utilize their manufacturing facilities to produce Amyris products commencing in 2011.

Under the terms of these contract manufacturing agreements, the Company provided necessary equipment for the manufacturing of its products, over which the Company retained ownership. The Company also reimbursed the contract manufacturers for an aggregate of $13.8 million in expenditures related to the modification of their facilities. The Company recorded facility modification costs as other assets and amortized them as an offset against purchases of inventory. Certain of these contract manufacturing agreements also impose fixed purchase commitments on the Company, regardless of the production volumes.

Beginning in March 2012, the Company initiated a plan to shift production capacity from the contract manufacturing facilities to Company-owned plants that are currently under construction. As a result, the Company evaluated its contract manufacturing agreements and recorded a loss of $31.2 million related to the write-off of $10.0 million in facility modification costs and the recognition of $21.2 million of fixed purchase commitments. The Company computed the loss on facility modification costs and fixed purchase commitments using the same lower of cost or market approach that is used to value inventory. The computation of the loss on firm purchase commitments is subject to several estimates, including cost to complete and the ultimate selling price of any Company products manufactured at the relevant production facilities, and is therefore inherently uncertain. The Company also recorded a loss on write off of production assets of $5.5 million related to Amyris-owned production equipment at contract manufacturing facilities.

Subsequent to recording the $31.2 million loss related to facility modification costs and fixed purchase commitments in the three months ended March 31, 2012, the Company will have a remaining aggregate firm purchase commitment related to contract manufacturers of $38.3 million . Based on the Company's current production volumes and estimated cost and selling price the Company does not expect losses on firm purchase commitments beyond what was recorded in the three months ended March 31, 2012. The Company will continue to evaluate the potential for losses in future periods based on updated production and sales

33



price assumptions.

Paraíso Bioenergia

In March 2011, the Company entered into a supply agreement with Paraíso Bioenergia. Under the agreement, the Company will construct fermentation and separation capacity to produce its products and Paraíso Bioenergia will supply sugar cane juice and other utilities. The Company will retain the full economic benefits enabled by the sale of Amyris farnesene-derived products over the lower of sugar or ethanol alternatives. In conjunction with the supply agreement, the Company also entered into an operating lease on real property owned by Paraíso Bioenergia. The real property will be used by the Company for the construction of an industrial facility (see Note 5).

Per the terms of the supply agreement, in the event that Paraíso is presented with an offer to sell or decides to sell the real property, the Company has the right of first refusal to acquire it. If the Company fails to exercise its right of first refusal the purchaser of the real property will need to comply with the specific obligations of Paraíso Bioenergia to the Company under the lease agreement.

Albemarle

In July 2011, the Company entered into a contract manufacturing agreement with Albemarle Corporation ("Albemarle"), which will provide toll manufacturing services at its facility in Orangeburg, South Carolina. Under this agreement, Albemarle will manufacture lubricant base oils from Biofene, which will be owned and distributed by the Company or a Company commercial partner. The initial term of this agreement is from July 31, 2011 through December 31, 2012. Albemarle is required to modify its facility, including installation and qualification of equipment and instruments necessary to perform the toll manufacturing services under the agreement. The Company reimbursed Albemarle $10.0 million for all capital expenditures related to the facility modification, which was accounted for as a prepaid asset. All equipment or facility modifications acquired or made by Albemarle will be owned by Albemarle, subject to Albemarle's obligation to transfer title to and ownership of certain assets to the Company within 30 days after termination of the agreement, at the Company's discretion and sole expense. As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the Company has recorded a liability of zero and $3.5 million , respectively, for the facility modification costs. In March 2012 the Company recorded a loss of $10.0 million related to the write off of the facility modification costs, described above.

In addition, the Company was required to pay a one-time, non-refundable performance bonus of $5.0 million if Albemarle delivered to the Company a certain quantity of the lubricant base stock by December 31, 2011 or $2.0 million if Albemarle delivered the same quantity by January 31, 2012. Based on Albermarle's performance as of December 31, 2011, the Company concluded that Albermarle had earned the bonus and recorded a liability of $5.0 million as of March 31, 2012 . The bonus is payable in two payments: one payment of $2.5 million on September 30, 2012 and one payment of $2.5 million on March 31, 2013.
 
In February 2012, the Company entered into an amended and restated agreement with Albemarle, which superseded the original contract manufacturing agreement with Albemarle.  The term of the new agreement continues through December 31, 2019.  The agreement includes certain obligations for the Company to pay fixed costs totaling $7.5 million , of which $3.5 million and $4.0 million are payable in 2012 and 2014, respectively. In the three months ended March 31, 2012, the Company recorded a corresponding loss related to these fixed purchase commitments, as described above. In addition, fixed costs of $2.0 million per quarter are payable in 2013 if the Company exercises its option to have product manufactured in the facility in 2013.  The agreement also includes variable pricing during the contract term.

Supply Agreements

The Company has also entered into agreements for the sale of Biofene and its derivatives directly to customers, including with Procter & Gamble Company ("P&G") for use in cleaning products, with M&G for use in plastics, with Kuraray Co., Ltd. ("Kuraray") for use in production of polymers, with Firmenich and Givaudan SA. ("Givaudan") for ingredients for the flavors and fragrances market, with Method for use in home and personal care products, and with Wilmar International Limited ("Wilmar") for use as a surfactant.

Soliance Agreements

In June 2010, the Company entered into an agreement with Soliance for the development and commercialization of Biofene-based squalane for use as an ingredient in cosmetics products. In December 2011, the Company and Soliance entered into an agreement and release to terminate the collaboration agreement and any other obligations with respect to the proposed joint venture. As part of the termination agreement the parties agreed that for a period commencing October 1, 2011 and ending on December

34



31, 2013, Soliance will be paid a commission of 10% of amounts received by the Company from Nikko Chemicals Co., Ltd. (“Nikko") on quantities of squalane sold by the Company to Nikko with respect to Nikko's committed minimum purchase obligation pursuant to the Nikko agreement. Concurrently with the execution of such termination agreement, the parties executed a distribution agreement, pursuant to which the Company appointed Soliance as its exclusive distributor to distribute the Company's squalane in the cosmetic market in the approved territory.

Nikko Chemicals

In August 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Nikko, a private limited company in Japan, which contemplated the Company selling certain minimum quantities of renewable squalane to Nikko (commencing in September 2011 and continuing for two years through the end of December 2013).


10. Draths Corporation Acquisition

On October 6, 2011 (the Closing Date), the Company completed an acquisition of assets of Draths related to production of renewable chemicals. The acquisition was accounted for as a business combination. In connection with the acquisition, the Company issued 362,319 shares of common stock, of which 41,408 shares were held in escrow and paid $2.9 million in cash.

The components of the purchase price allocation for Draths are as follows:

Purchase Consideration:
 
 
(in thousands)
 
 
Fair value of common stock issued to Draths
 
$
7,000

Cash paid to Draths
 
2,934

     Total purchase consideration
 
$
9,934


Allocation of Purchase Price:
 
 
(in thousands)
 
 
Property and Equipment
 
$
713

Other
 
101

In-process research and development
 
8,560

Goodwill
 
560

     Total purchase consideration
 
$
9,934

The Company allocated $8.6 million of the purchase price of Draths to acquired IPR&D. This amount represents management's valuation of the fair value of assets acquired at the date of the acquisition. Management used the income approach to determine the estimated fair values of acquired IPR&D, applying a risk adjusted discount rate of 30% to the development project's cash flows. The discounted cash flow model applies probability weighting factors, based on estimates of successful product development and commercialization, to estimated future net cash flows resulting from projected revenues and related costs. These success rates take into account the stages of completion and the risks surrounding successful development and commercialization of the underlying products such as estimates of revenues and operating profits related to the IPR&D considering its stage of development; the time and resources needed to complete the development; the life of the potential commercialized product and associated risks, including the inherent difficulties and uncertainties in developing a product.
     
Goodwill totaling $0.6 million represents the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of tangible and identifiable intangible assets acquired and is due primarily to synergies expected from combining the new genetic pathway with the Company's existing platform to accelerate development to get the technology to market sooner leading to increased market penetration from future products and customers.

The Draths business acquisition was a taxable transaction. For federal and state tax purposes, the above in-process research and development and goodwill is amortized over a 15-year period. The Company has determined that there are no significant differences in the tax basis of assets and the basis for financial reporting purposes. In addition, the business combination did not have any impact on the Company's deferred tax balance, net of the full valuation allowance, or to uncertain tax positions, at the

35



acquisition date.

The Company applies the applicable accounting principles set forth in the U.S. Financial Accounting Standards Board's Accounting Standards Codification to its intangible assets (including goodwill), which prohibits the amortization of intangible assets with indefinite useful lives and requires that these assets be reviewed for impairment at least annually. There are several methods that can be used to determine the estimated fair value of the IPR&D acquired in a business combination. The Company has used the "income method," which applies a probability weighting that considers the risk of development and commercialization, to the estimated future net cash flows that are derived from projected sales revenues and estimated costs. These projections are based on factors such as relevant market size, pricing of similar products, and expected industry trends. The estimated future net cash flows are then discounted to the present value using an appropriate discount rate. These assets are treated as indefinite-lived intangible assets until completion or abandonment of the projects, at which time the assets will be amortized over the remaining useful life or written off, as appropriate. If the carrying amount of the assets is greater than the measures of fair value, impairment is considered to have occurred and a write-down of the asset is recorded. Any finding that the value of its intangible assets has been impaired would require the Company to write-down the impaired portion, which could reduce the value of its assets and reduce its net income for the year in which the related impairment charges occur.  
      

11. Stockholders’ Equity

Private Placement

In February 2012, the Company completed a private placement of its common stock (the “Private Placement”) of 10,160,325 shares of common stock at a price of $5.78 for aggregate proceeds of $58.7 million .

In connection with the Private Placement, the Company entered into an agreement with an investor to purchase additional shares of Common Stock for an additional $15.0 million upon satisfaction by the Company of criteria associated with the commissioning of the Company's Paraíso Bioenergia SA production plant in Brazil by March 2013. Additionally, such agreement granted certain investors Board designation rights and certain rights of first investment with respect to future issuances of the Company's securities.


Common Stock

Pursuant to the Company’s amended and restated certificate of incorporation, the Company is authorized to issue 100,000,000 shares of common stock. Holders of the Company’s common stock are entitled to dividends as and when declared by the Board of Directors, subject to the rights of holders of all classes of stock outstanding having priority rights as to dividends. There have been no dividends declared to date. The holder of each share of common stock is entitled to one vote.

Preferred Stock

Pursuant to the Company’s amended and restated certificate of incorporation, the Company is authorized to issue 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock. The Board of Directors has the authority, without action by its stockholders, to designate and issue shares of preferred stock in one or more series and to fix the rights, preferences, privileges and restrictions thereof. Prior to the closing of the Company’s IPO, the Company had four series of convertible preferred stock outstanding, including Series D preferred stock issued to Total (see Note 9). As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , the Company had zero convertible preferred stock outstanding.

Common Stock Warrants

During the period from January 1, 2008 to September 30, 2010 the Company issued 182,405 warrants in connection with placement agent fees associated with its preferred stock issuance, capital and operating lease agreements and consulting services. Upon the closing of the Company’s IPO on September 30, 2010, these outstanding convertible preferred stock warrants were automatically converted into common stock warrants to purchase 195,604 shares of common stock. In addition, the fair value of the convertible preferred stock warrants as of September 30, 2010, estimated to be $2.3 million using the Black-Scholes option pricing model, was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

In December 2011, in connection with a capital lease agreement, the Company issued a warrant to purchase 21,087 shares of the Company's common stock at an exercise price of $10.67 a share. The Company estimated the fair value of these warrants as of the issuance date to be $193,000 and was recorded as other assets and amortized subsequently over the term of the lease.

36



The fair value was based on the contractual term of the warrants of 10 years, risk free interest rate of 2.0% , expected volatility of 86% and zero expected dividend yield. This warrant remains unexercised and outstanding as of March 31, 2012 .
Each of these warrants includes a cashless exercise provision which permits the holder of the warrant to elect to exercise the warrant without paying the cash exercise price, and receive a number of shares determined by multiplying (i) the number of shares for which the warrant is being exercised by (ii) the difference between the fair market value of the stock on the date of exercise and the warrant exercise price, and dividing such by (iii) the fair market value of the stock on the date of exercise. During three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , zero and 190,468 shares of warrants were exercised through the cashless exercise provision and 77,087 shares of common stock were issued after deducting the shares to cover the cashless exercises. There were no warrants exercised during the three months ended March 31, 2011 .

As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 , the Company had the following unexercised common stock warrants outstanding:
 
 
Expiration Date
 
Exercise
Price per Share
 
Shares as of
Underlying Stock
 
 
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
Common Stock
 
1/31/2018
 
$
24.88

 

 
2,884

Common Stock
 
9/23/2018
 
$
25.26

 
2,252

 
2,252

Common Stock
 
12/23/2021
 
$
10.67

 
21,087

 
21,087

Total
 
 
 
 
 
23,339

 
26,223


12. Stock-Based Compensation Plans

2010 Equity Incentive Plan

The Company's 2010 Equity Incentive Plan (“2010 Equity Plan”) became effective on September 28, 2010 and will terminate in 2020. Pursuant to the 2010 Equity Plan, any shares of the Company’s common stock (i) issued upon exercise of stock options granted under the 2005 Plan that cease to be subject to such option and (ii) issued under the 2005 Plan that are forfeited or repurchased by the Company at the original purchase price will become part of the 2010 Equity Plan. Subsequent to the effective date of the 2010 Equity Plan, an additional 160,247 shares that were forfeited under the 2005 Plan were added to the shares reserved for issuance under the 2010 Equity Plan.

The number of shares reserved for issuance under the 2010 Equity Plan increase automatically on January 1 of each year starting with January 1, 2011, by a number of shares equal to 5.0% percent of the Company’s total outstanding shares as of the immediately preceding December 31 st . The Company’s Board of Directors or Leadership Development and Compensation Committee is able to reduce the amount of the increase in any particular year. The 2010 Equity Plan provides for the granting of common stock options, restricted stock awards, stock bonuses, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock units and performance awards. It allows for time-based or performance-based vesting for the awards. Options granted under the 2010 Equity Plan may be either incentive stock options ("ISOs") or non-statutory stock options ("NSOs"). ISOs may be granted only to Company employees (including officers and directors who are also employees). NSOs may be granted to Company employees, non-employee directors and consultants. The Company will be able to issue no more than 30,000,000 shares pursuant to the grant of ISOs under the 2010 Equity Plan. Options under the 2010 Equity Plan may be granted for periods of up to ten years. All options issued to date have had a ten year life. Under the plan, the exercise price of an ISOs and NSOs may not be less than 100% of the fair market value of the shares on the date of grant. The exercise price of any ISOs and NSOs granted to a 10% stockholder may not be less than 110% of the fair value of the underlying stock on the date of grant. The options granted to date generally vest over four to five years.

As of March 31, 2012 , options to purchase 3,287,801 shares of our common stock granted from the 2010 Equity Plan were outstanding and 5,360,719 shares of the Company’s common stock remained available for future awards that may be granted from the 2010 Equity Plan. The options outstanding as of March 31, 2012 had a weighted-average exercise price of approximately $23.59 per share.

2005 Stock Option/Stock Issuance Plan

In 2005, the Company established its 2005 Stock Option/Stock Issuance Plan (the “2005 Plan”) which provided for the granting of common stock options, restricted stock units, restricted stock and stock purchase rights awards to employees and consultants of the Company. The 2005 Plan allowed for time-based or performance-based vesting for the awards. Options granted under the 2005 Plan were ISOs or NSOs. ISOs were granted only to Company employees (including officers and directors who

37



are also employees). NSOs were granted to Company employees, non-employee directors, and consultants.

All options issued under the 2005 Plan have had a ten year life. The exercise prices of ISOs and NSOs granted under the 2005 Plan were not less than 100% of the estimated fair value of the shares on the date of grant, as determined by the Board of Directors. The exercise price of an ISO and NSO granted to a 10% stockholder could not be less than 110% of the estimated fair value of the underlying stock on the date of grant as determined by the Board of Directors. The options generally vested over five years.

As of March 31, 2012 , options to purchase 4,580,766 shares of the Company’s common stock granted from the 2005 Stock Option/Stock Issuance Plan remained outstanding and as a result of the adoption of the 2010 Equity Incentive Plan discussed above, zero shares of the Company’s common stock remained available for issuance under the 2005 Plan. The options outstanding under the 2005 Plan as of March 31, 2012 had a weighted-average exercise price of approximately $6.63 per share.

No income tax benefit has been recognized relating to stock-based compensation expense and no tax benefits have been realized from exercised stock options or release of restricted stock units.

2010 Employee Stock Purchase Plan

The 2010 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “2010 ESPP”) became effective on September 28, 2010. The 2010 ESPP is designed to enable eligible employees to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock at a discount. Each offering period is for one year and consists of two six-month purchase periods. Each twelve-month offering period generally commences on May 16 th and November 16 th , each consisting of two six-month purchase periods. The purchase price for shares of common stock under the 2010 ESPP is the lesser of 85% of the fair market value of the Company’s common stock on the first day of the applicable offering period or the last day of each purchase period. A total of 168,627 shares of common stock were initially reserved for future issuance under the 2010 Employee Stock Purchase Plan. During the first eight years of the life of the 2010 ESPP, the number of shares reserved for issuance increases automatically on January 1 st of each year, starting with January 1, 2011, by a number of shares equal to 1% of the Company’s total outstanding shares as of the immediately preceding December 31 st . Pursuant to the automatic increase provision, an additional 459,325 shares were reserved for issuance during the three months ended March 31, 2012 for a cumulative total of 897,799 additional shares reserved for issuance under the automatic increase provision. The Company’s Board of Directors or Leadership Development and Compensation Committee is able to reduce the amount of the increase in any particular year. No more than 10,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock may be issued under the 2010 ESPP and no other shares may be added to this plan without the approval of the Company’s stockholders.

During the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , zero shares of common stock were purchased under the 2010 ESPP. At March 31, 2012 , 762,173 shares of the Company’s common stock remained available for issuance under the 2010 ESPP.
 
Stock Option Activity

The Company’s stock option activity and related information for the three months ended March 31, 2012 was as follows:
 
 
 
 
Number
Outstanding
 
Weighted -
Average
Exercise
Price
 
Weighted -
Average
Remaining
Contractual
Life (Years)
 
Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(in thousands)
Outstanding - December 31, 2011
 
8,377,016

 
$
14.05

 
7.9

 
$
29,127

 
Options granted
 
48,050

 
$
7.98

 

 

 
Options exercised
 
(107,236
)
 
$
3.50

 

 

 
Options cancelled
 
(389,263
)
 
$
24.50

 

 

Outstanding - March 31, 2012
 
7,928,567

 
$
13.64

 
7.5

 
$
6,984

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Vested and expected to vest after March 31, 2012
 
7,630,066

 
$
13.41

 
7.5

 
$
6,961

Exercisable at March 31, 2012
 
3,956,629

 
$
9.07

 
6.6

 
$
6,374



The aggregate intrinsic value of options exercised under all option plans was $596,000 and $10.4 million for the three months

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ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 , respectively, determined as of the date of option exercise.

The Company’s restricted stock units ("RSUs") and restricted stock activity and related information for the three months ended March 31, 2012 was as follows:

  
 
RSUs